Lady's Mantle Benefits

LaurieLovesLearning
LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin
edited November 2020 in Wild Edibles & Medicinals

Women of all ages can benefit from this beautiful herb. It is good for pains, spotty bleeding, end of pregnancy, postpartum & menopause. It is also good to use for a prolapsed uterus.

So many women silently struggle hopelessly with this last problem and so many get taken in by the medical establishment & so called "experts" who offer concoctions & strange exercises. You can help yourself & don't have to spend/waste lots of money and/or be at their mercy. If anyone is interested, I will start a thread about what more I have learned about this subject, carefully gleaned from the surrounding online & offline noise, noise in which there is a lot of scum. I have no respect for people who take monetary advantage of others who are hurting.

I have an aunt who had full uterine prolapse. She said a midwife gave her something & it worked. When I asked what it was, she didn't remember. I bet that it was this or some combination containing this herb.

Lady's mantle can be used for men too. Haha Being an astringent, it has other benefits that I have not touched on.


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Comments

  • nksunshine27
    nksunshine27 Posts: 343 ✭✭✭

    thats interesting the leaves look alot like common mallow but the flowers are way different, i heard shepherds purse is really good for the same stuff. i dont know if we have ladys mantel growing here of not

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    @Laurie Great post! There is so much Lady's Mantle growing in Barkerville Historic Townsite and surrounding area. It was brought in by the pioneer women as one of the important medicinals during the gold rush days and still grows there today (quite prolifically). Barkerville is at 4500' in the Cariboo Mountains where it gets a huge annual snowfall and extremely cold temperatures. Frost can occur during any month (I have seen snow in both July and August). So it is a hardly one for sure. One of the constituents is salicylic acid so that's why it is helpful for pain relief. The astringency makes it a good mouthwash for canker sores or a tea for diarrhea.

    @nksunshine27 They do have somewhat similar looking leaves. Lady's Mantle leaves are a bit more deeply divided. Both are members of the Rosaceae family.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin
    edited February 2020

    @nksunshine27 Even if you don't have it growing close by, a nearby nursery or seed supplier might carry young plants or roots. Note that the author said that she had difficulty starting it from seed.

    I went looking for health benefits of this lovely plant when I got an email from a local seed supplier promoting a new cultivar. I thought that I had heard this could be useful for health, so I went looking. I am very glad that I did!

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    @Laurie I'd like to hear more about its benefits, especially if it involve female issues.

    You mention it's helpful for a prolapsed uterus; do you think it would have any benefit for a prolapse rectum?

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin

    @blevinandwomba I have not seen any helps on that issue, although often if there is one prolapse, there are often others. I am always gathering information about this subject in general, and it is most often the uterus that is focused on.

    I do wonder if the general exercises that are often talked about for uterus would help...lunges, squatting, hip circles, crawling, downward dog, walking. Squatty potty, keeping well dehydrated, having good digestion, & not holding back should help too.

    I am not sure if Dr. Christopher's site might have something or not. Possibly.

    @torey are you aware of any herbs for this specifically? It is a tough subject with lots of misinformation and those who profit off of womens' fears and desperation, claiming cures but without delivering real results.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    @Laurie & @blevinandwomba This is a difficult question. There are many reasons for a prolapsed rectum so knowing the cause is important to know how to individually treat the condition. That being said, Lady's Mantle can be used for any kind of prolapse, although it has an affinity for womens' reproductive systems. There are other equally good astringents in the Rosaceae family. Blackberry root might be more indicated than Lady's Mantle. Witch Hazel can bring relief. But without knowing the specific cause and symptomology it is difficult to make recommendations. Due to the nature of the area involved and the possibility of infection, one should seek ongoing medical attention.

    Lady's Mantle's astringency helps to tone lax or swollen tissues, especially in the uterus, helping to regulate a normal flow. Particularly useful for excessive flow or bleeding between periods. Containing salicylic acid, it is useful for painful menses and cramping. Lady's Mantle may help reduce fibroids and pain from endometriosis and can reduce excessive vaginal discharge. Midwives might use it for excessive post partum bleeding (although hemorrhages should not be addressed at home). Also helpful with diarrhea. An infusion or tincture could be used for the conditions just listed. It can be used in a sitz bath following childbirth or for prolapse.

    If you have any issues with regularity, Lady's Mantle is a very safe herb. GRAS (Generally Recommended As Safe). Although, as with any herb, you should consult with a practitioner if pregnant or breast-feeding or have any under-lying health conditions.

    Lady's Mantle's astringency makes it a good mouthwash/gargle (strong decoction) for sore throats, canker sores, ulcers, thrush and bleeding gums. A weak decoction can be useful as an eye wash for conjunctivitis.

    @Laurie is right about suggestions for diet and good digestion with exercises to improve the tone of the pelvic floor. Something we should all be paying more attention to especially if we hope to maintain control of our bodily functions as we age. Yoga would be excellent along with the traditional Kegel exercises. .

  • Karin
    Karin Posts: 272 ✭✭✭

    Ruth Trickey's classic text "Women, Hormones and the Menstrual Cycle" - an excellent book - states that Alchemilla is nervine, astringent and anti-inflammatory. The astringent quality of course makes it useful for bleeding and it is specific for helping to lessen heavy menstrual bleeding, and bleeding between periods. It was used in a study in teenage girls in France to lessen PMS and heavy bleeding successfully. It can also be useful in menopausal women with incontinence, again most likely from its astringent effect.

    I would say that the astringency could also be useful in rectal prolapse, but most helpful for that would be to assess lifestyle and change the causes. Witch Hazel has traditionally been used for haemorrhoids, so may be the better herb.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin

    @torey @blevinandwomba Some cautions:

    I have learned that certain yoga poses and common core exercises (I am not talking about public school curriculum 😂) aren't good for prolapse and can make it worse. You have to be very careful what is chosen. Anything that puts downward pressure or hard pressure on the core should be avoided (sit ups, crunches, pushups, planking, bicycle, double leg lift anything, and a few more). The ones that I mentioned are considered some of the safest exercises for prolapse.

    I would caution people using kegels as well. It can make the situation worse if done improperly, the way most people are taught & actually do them. I have read that there is a correct way, but my understanding is still limited on this. An unquestioned and safe, foolproof way to exercise these same muscles is through s*x and simply by walking. Walking with good posture (so basically not in a slouching position) will help the muscles naturally exercise in a proper way. Walking is excellent and perfectly safe.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    @Laurie You are right. Anyone with a prolapse of any kind should get some kind of professional help for these suggestions.

    I was assuming everyone knew how to do Kegel exercises properly. I should have said to get proper instruction on the most effective way to do this for rectal prolapse. Similarly, people should speak with a qualified, experienced Yoga instructor before a class to explain any health issues that you have so that you don't do anything to aggravate the condition.

    Susun Weed has a very good book on the subject of women's reproductive system health. "Down There: Sexual and Reproductive Health the Wise Woman Way"

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin
    edited March 2020

    @torey Most doctors & most physiotherapists & massage folks who would recommend this do not teach the correct way. I have found two online female physiotherapists that might have it right, however. I can't remember the names at the moment, which is really not helpful to anyone here, because as I said, there is a lot of bad advice online too. I find that I know if something was wrong to do usually the day after. Some things you know sooner as you learn to pay attention to your body. Walking would still be your safest option.

    Sometimes a specialist who does internal work can be good. I went to one once and her approach did not quite go with what I had learned, and she could not give me any evidence that her ideas worked. I went to an osteopath & TCM acupuncturist too. I didn't go back to any of them, but instead, kept researching.

    Going to a massage therapist who studied Mayan massage was actually helpful as she fixed a few things in one visit (and explained everything) & taught me self massage.

    I don't believe that a professional always has to be consulted in these cases. I think the person has to be aware of options, and just the same be careful who they listen to. Move forward with non-invasive, non permanent, unquestionably safe things first, then look further if needed. Only proceed if you are comfortable, and be willing to change paths if you start to feel uncomfortable. Don't get stuck where you don't want to be.

    One other helpful practice one can take up is belly dancing. This gently works everything and except for the hip drop (which is jarring), is very safe.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    @Laurie I don't always trust the professionals, either, and do a lot of my own research. However, due to government regulations regarding my status as an EMA First Responder and for my medical insurance for herbal and homeopathic practices, I am required to mention seeking professional attention whenever I am giving any kind of recommendations or teachings, in person or online. So I am always careful to make sure I am cautious of my wording and avoid any legal issues. Restrictions abound! :)

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin

    @torey I fully understand your precarious position. I don't fault you in any way for stating what you are required to as a disclaimer! It must get very complicated.

    I am not under any such restrictions, however, and am not prescribing anything...only sharing opinions & my experience so far. ;)

    In this case, I felt the need to remind people keep an open mind as they go forward. Continually asking questions & carefully researching is always the best way.

  • Karin
    Karin Posts: 272 ✭✭✭

    @Laurie as always, you are the expert on your own body - after all, you are the one inhabiting it!! It is wise to do your own research and make your own assessments depending on your individual responses. As you say, there is a lot of misinformation out there, those who have been around for a long time e.g. Susun Weed, Ruth Trickey have the experience to know more about individual results, but even so, I take their advice with a "pinch of salt" dependent on my own responses.

    One of the absolute best things I found for stopping heavy bleeding was mega doses of vitamin C, which I was actually taking to help with hayfever. An unexpected (and not mentioned anywhere else that I had seen) was the reduction in heavy menstruation. This is probably due to the fact that vitamin C is essential for our bodies to make healthy connective tissue. Strong, elastic blood vessels mean less breakage, less bleeding and quicker healing, also it aids the absorption of iron, so helps in anaemia too.

    Because of vitamin C's action on improving blood vessels, it also helps in reducing blood pressure - this I have seen in many cases.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin

    @kmartin.mail I think those types of discoveries are the best. You never forget them.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    @Laurie Thank you for understanding my position. Something that I can say is that the homeopathic remedy Sepia is a main remedies used for prolapse, both of the uterus and the rectum. Podophyllum is another. Both should be available at any health food store that sells homeopathic remedies. I also spoke to a Registered Massage Therapist who has taken a CEU workshop in Visceral Massage. She wasn't expert enough in the speciality to make a recommendation as to whether or not it might be useful but suggested that you might contact your local Provincial (or State for anyone else) Massage Therapy Association to see if they can recommend someone who does visceral massage to see if it would be a suitable treatment for prolapse.

  • herbantherapy
    herbantherapy Posts: 453 ✭✭✭✭

    My patches of lady’s mantle are finally going to be big enough to truly harvest this year. Last year I enjoyed the dew from the leaves and made one cup of tea but could not bare to take any more leaves as the plant is just so beautiful.

    I wonder how it would fare it I did cut it down in the fall when the leaves are still green instead of letting it naturally die back? Should I leave some foliage for photosynthesis or would the roots already be in good shape by September/October?

    I have used Lady’s Mantle in hopes to stop heavy bleeding and it did slow down the bleeding and I stopped passing large clots but continued to bleed for several weeks even drinking 3 cups per day.

    @kmartin.mail lady’s mantle is high in vitamin C! My accidental discovery of stopping heavy bleeding was vitamin K after eating nearly a whole broccoli casserole by myself in two days. Which is way more than I normally eat but I kept craving it so allowed myself to go for it and it stopped the bleeding I had experienced for 62 days. Eating large amounts of cruciferous veggies has stopped bleeding for me several times but it’s not always a guarantee.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    Yarrow is a good herb for heavy bleeding as well. It might also be helpful in a sitz bath for prolapse.

  • Karin
    Karin Posts: 272 ✭✭✭

    @herbantherapy cruciferous veggies helping reduce heavy bleeding could also be, in part, due to their high levels of DIM which helps the liver detox oestrogen. Oestrogen makes the lining of the uterus grow and get thicker, so lower oestrogen levels could mean less lining to shed, so less bleeding.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin

    Such a great, beneficial discussion! I am loving it. 😃

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    @Laurie , @torey , and @kmartin.mail thanks for the input! Sorry I took so long to reply.

    @Laurie so in regards to exercises, does crawling mean a specific exercise or do you mean crawling on your hands and knees?

    You won't have to beg me not to do push-ups/crunches, etc. Crunches and similar exercises don't just make my muscles hurt, I actually get some stomach/gut pain and even a little nausea. I'm pretty active, and most exercise are fun, but not those ones. Push-ups don't hurt my stomach, I'm just so bad at them that I always feel like I'm going to hurt myself-actually have a couple of times, in a minor way.

    I've been working on my diet in hopes of improving my digestive and hormone issues for several years now. My current diet has helped both significantly. I am much more regular, but I'm still having some issues. I was recently thinking that I need to look beyond diet for this issue, so this post was very timely. I hadn't even thought of herbal supplements.

    For the record, I think what I am dealing with is a partial prolapse- it comes out( eeek! this is such personal stuff to be posting on the world wide web. I'm kind of embarrassed right now) when I defecate, but goes back in on its own when I stop pushing. Fairly certain this is my rectum, not hemorhoids. I try not to strain, but there is a bit of a vicious cycle as such issues make it harder for you to go. Often a feel a strong urge to go, but nothings comes out but my guts. For the record, I strained constantly when I was a child, and dealt with undiagnosed lactose intolerance for several years as an adult, which I believe caused my issues.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    @blevinandwomba Since this has been an issue since childhood, a homeopath would be better able to get to the root cause. That being said, one of the top remedies listed in the repertory for these symptoms is Ignatia which is a very common remedy so you should be able to find it easily wherever homeopathic remedies are sold. This is not something that is meant to be taken every day. There are several good books on homeopathy that can lead you through dosing.

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    Well, @torey , this is a little awkward (again), but I don't mean I had a prolapse since childhood. I strained constantly because I somehow got the idea as a child that everyone was supposed to defecate everytime that they urinated- so I strained until I did. Somewhere around middle school I figured out that it wasn't always necessary. I had some learning issues; I often wasn't aware of things obvious to most other children, that they didn't need adults to explain to them. I learned great from books; not so much from everyday experience. I still have difficulty with picking up on patterns-like people's schedules.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    @blevinandwomba I got what you meant about the straining being the issue. All those things that you have just mentioned that may seem to be totally unrelated to your health issue, are what a homeopath would want to know to be able to get a remedy truly suited to you from a whole body, mind and spirit perspective.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin

    @blevinandwomba Just plain crawling on hands & knees. Alternately arching the back and dipping it (not sure if that's clear) can help too. You might feel silly, but improvement is the goal. You are strengthening weak muscles & such and helping relax those that are too tight, essentially balancing the support.

    If you find something works for your specific issue, focus on continuing that first before adding another step.

    Don't be embarrassed. It is a real thing that many deal with. It will be both stretched and supports will have become compromised too.

    After feeling devastated & embarrassed, I decided to overcome my situation & be open about what I am dealing with..I have at least 2 types...early-mid stage. I also want to share what I found helps to benefit others since there are so many others who stay silent out of shame of embarrassment. You would be surprised how many people you know deal with it silently. It can negatively affect relationships too...and that just shouldn't be. We all need to work together to help one another overcome that stigma and "treatment" abuse of those who deal with it daily.

    I too, can trace certain issues to my childhood. Kids just don't know everything and sometimes parents are oblivious to what they might contribute to. For example, I was often told to "hold it" (1 or 2) and sometimes that was a very long time. Yeah...don't force & don't hold. This is another reason to teach your children proper habits and let them know (in appropriate ways) why it is important to be careful & take care of yourself. Also, if they do proper things when young, they don't question them as "strange ways." That brings to mind...they sit pretty much all day in school...sitting (or standing too much) is bad. Get them active doing all sorts of natural movement.

    For women, birthing practices can also contribute, but don't always cause POP (pelvic organ prolapse). For example, on the back is the worst way to birth. There are much better, natural ways & practices that help protect rather than harm. I will only post these birth related things on TGN if someone really wants to know. I learned so much when I researched birth. Haha..it might fall into "grow your own" but certainly not "food."

    @torey Has training and good knowledge. The more things you use to heal, the more well rounded your approach, the better and faster you will heal.

    Hugs going out to you, @blevinandwomba!

  • norabelehcim
    norabelehcim Posts: 58 ✭✭✭

    I have not had occasion to use Lady's Mantle as anything but an astringent, topical poulticing wound herb (folkways); animals graze the leaves as forage, as well, so over-harvesting would not be optimal.

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    Thank you both, @torey and @Laurie.

    @Laurie actually, the reason I asked about crawling was that I have regular opportunities to do so. Every morning I do an exercise game with a 3 to 4-year-old class. Most of the exercises( Spin like a ballerina! Swim like a dolphin! Hop like a kangaroo!) I do with the kids, but I usually skip the Crawl like a Cow, not because I find it uncomfortable but a little tedious and silly( though Tip-toeing through the Spooky Forest is never silly..) Now I guess I don't have an excuse; though, one of the kids did suggest that I didn't have to crawl with the cows because I am the farmer.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,210 admin

    @blevinandwomba Excellent! Maybe the kids would like to take turns being a farmer, after all, it is a good thing to aspire to. ;)

  • Desiree
    Desiree Posts: 255 ✭✭✭

    Interesting article and I want to see if I have any here (rural Ohio) or if I can grow it.

  • Melinda
    Melinda Posts: 123 ✭✭✭

    Very interesting article. I am going to see if I can find some.

  • Iris Weaver
    Iris Weaver Posts: 32 ✭✭✭

    @torey and @nksunshine27 Lady's mantle is in the Rose Family. Common mallow, and other mallows, are in the Mallow family. They tend to have rather different properties.