Ha cha cha Sriracha

Comments

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    I made a sriracha-type sauce once, and it was quite good. I have successfully lacto-fermented quite a few vegetables, including hot peppers(whole or sliced), but I've had a couple of flops when making fermented paste. Now I just puree the peppers after I've fermented them- its not exactly the same, being more "briny", but its still quite good. Lacto-fermented red jalapenos, pureed with roasted garlic cloves, mild vinegar, and sugar( raw, I think) made for a very delicious sauce.

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @blevinandwomba I love sriracha and can't wait to try this recipe. There are more recipes on their site I can't wait to try including the french fries. I hope you find something else in this info that you like.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    A friend of mine grows an assortment of peppers every year. Will have to try this one out.

  • Merin Porter
    Merin Porter Posts: 1,026 admin

    Ooooo, @silvertipgrizz, now you've done it! I LOVE me some sriracha!!!!

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks @silvertipgrizz I love Sriracha and I put it on almost everything!

  • tomandcara
    tomandcara Posts: 712 ✭✭✭✭

    @silvertipgrizz interesting recipe. I was excited to see the fermentation step but then when you boil it in the next step it effective pasteurizes it and kills the sauce. Makes me wonder what would happen if you don't pasteurize it???

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    You are correct. Boiling it will make it "shelf stable" to a point. I just et my fermented hot sauces keep going. When the flavor is right, I refrigerate to slow fermentation. But really, I've never tasted one that was "over-fermented". If you can leave them at room temp and not have to worry about exploding jars, they just get better. Pickles get mushy, but I think the texture of sauces improves as they age.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    Oh, and for a really incredible variation on this sauce, smoke your peppers! Jalapenos don't dry well, so I usually hang them up to dry as much as possible. At the first sign of mold, I take down all the moldy ones and put them on the smoker when I am barbecuing meat.... hours of low, slow hickory smoke preserves them and enhances the flavor beyond imagination! If you like the smokiness of adobo, but prefer the simpler, less sweet taste of siracha, try smoked peppers!

  • tomandcara
    tomandcara Posts: 712 ✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 Thank you for your feedback about fermenting. I was worried about exploding jars. I have had that happen . My nest question is why do do you wait to smoke the peppers?

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin
    edited May 2020

    It has to do with the moisture content and caramelization. If you smoke fresh peppers, they just kind of melt. Dried peppers become like raisins in texture. Sure, you could totally make as sauce from smoke-cooked peppers... but there is a depth of flavor raisins have that grapes don't.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin
    edited May 2020

    … doesn't make much sense in writing... but try it.... then it will make sense!

  • tomandcara
    tomandcara Posts: 712 ✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 Actually, to me at least, it makes a lot of sense and answers my question. Thank you

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    Wow, well... I think I just discovered a whole new favorite hot sauce! I'll post this here since we had mentioned smoked peppers.... @tomandcara But, this goes well beyond smoked. I'd say this is made from burned green peppers... like how you might do them if you were going to peel peppers.... but leaving the burned peels on. I LOVE El Yucateca habanero sauces and just spotted a new one! This is their "reserve" sauce. It is basically jet black. The ingredients are only peppers, salt, garlic, onion, citric acid and vinegar.... but, my taste buds do not lie... there is charcoal in it... like a mole! So, the next step for me is to figure out a fermented version. So, the next time I grill some meat, over natural hardwood coals, I'm going to put some peppers, onions and garlic (whole and unpeeled) right on the coals and let the outside burn... then make sauce!

  • tomandcara
    tomandcara Posts: 712 ✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 sounds good. Makes me think of roasted green chilies. We do that under the broiler in the oven. I know people with gas stoves do it over the open flames on the burner. my thought is if you keep them above the coals you could still get the charring on the outside and the insides of the garlic, chili and onions would cook slowly and the onion and garlic would caramelize some, there would be the charring on the outside. I would think for the fermenting aspect you would do the same thing you do for your other salsas. Keep me posted on this experiment.