Big Lawns or Gardens: Is it just me?

annebeloncik
annebeloncik Posts: 62 ✭✭✭

Anybody else drive by big open lawns or patches of grass by the road and think, "I could grow so much food there!" 😂

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Comments

  • Ethereal Earth
    Ethereal Earth Posts: 142 ✭✭✭

    I do happen to think that, but I more think it would look better with a small grass section and then mostly meadow/wildflowers for the pollinators. Most wildflowers that you can sow are also medicinal.

  • Ethereal Earth
    Ethereal Earth Posts: 142 ✭✭✭

    @torey I had never thought of having a meadow on the roof. That is a great idea. Low maintenance, beneficial, and beautiful.

  • shaley1357
    shaley1357 Posts: 33 ✭✭✭

    Every day. I have a closed down plant nursery near me that has been fallow for at least 6 years. I'm sure the property owner is just waiting for the value to hit his price point before it becomes another McMansion neighborhood. I would rent it from him but I'd hate to put in the effort to have it sold out from under me.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    About 15 years ago at least one Japanese company was looking at selling a system that would allow growing crops on the roofs of commercial buildings, even in downtown Tokyo. I'm not what became of it, but it was a very interesting approach. I actually visited the company and saw the work they were doing, and they were very serious about it.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    HOAs are a fairly new thing, found mostly on homes built in the last 20 - 30 years. If a property is older than that, it is unlikely to have HOA restrictions on it.

    I won't buy an HOA property under any circumstances.

  • Ethereal Earth
    Ethereal Earth Posts: 142 ✭✭✭

    @shaley1357 Could you possible use just the greenhouse portions with containers so you can move them if he sells?

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    Yup. It hurts a little. All that wasted water...

  • Ethereal Earth
    Ethereal Earth Posts: 142 ✭✭✭
    edited June 2020

    @torey @catherine.james


    This is a fairly interesting development from France. While it pertains to new construction only, at least it is a step in the right direction.

  • MissPatricia
    MissPatricia Posts: 318 ✭✭✭

    Yes, I do, especially now with our current food situation. I am so glad that I do not have to worry about laws and rules that prohibit gardening street side. The only place that I can have a garden reasonably close to my house is my front yard as I have a ravine behind the house. Now I could garden in the field farther back, but it just would not happen: too long a walk, too far to carry tools, no water hook-up.

  • Ethereal Earth
    Ethereal Earth Posts: 142 ✭✭✭

    @catherine.james I do not know much about HOA's but know they are a frequent thing in Vegas (a lot of new developments and growth around here).


    I know I want to just buy land and build my own home. IF land is bought near a development would the HOA apply to that? Maybe a separate thread on HOA's should be made.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @etherealearthhomestead "I do not know much about HOA's but know they are a frequent thing in Vegas (a lot of new developments and growth around here). I know I want to just buy land and build my own home. IF land is bought near a development would the HOA apply to that? Maybe a separate thread on HOA's should be made."

    Unfortunately young cities like Las Vegas and Phoenix, and indeed much of desert southwest, tend to have a lot of HOAs because they are mostly new development created by developers, and few small lots are available outside of the city. If you can find something built pre-1990, there's a better chance that it's not encumbered.

    IANAL, but no, buying land near a development should not put you under an HOA. The HOA is usually created by the developer, and when he sells the land in his development, part of the paperwork you sign is an agreement to abide "restrictive covenants", and the HOA is there to enforce them. HOAs are associated with private contracts, not state or city law, and buying land near someone doesn't put you under any private obligations to them. This is a difference from zoning laws, which are state, county, or town restrictiosn that apply to everyone.

    As long as you buy land that doesn't have significant restrictive covenants and isn't currently part of an HOA, just being near a development shouldn't have any legal effect. Of course, your HOA neighbors may informally be annoyed with you if they perceive you as making their community less valuable, but they wouldn't have legal recourse.

    Either buy your own land and build, or buy a property built pre-1990, or better yet, pre-1980. This is going to be hard to do in desert areas, though. It's easy to do in much of the United States, though. (And remember that if you buy land from a developer, he could still require you to sign restrictive covenants and be an HOA member. You would rather buy land from an individual, not a developer.)

    Check for covenants and restrictions, nicknamed "CCRs", when buying proprety. HOAs are just the enforcement arm. It's the CCRs, which are agreements not to do something, that are the root problem. Some CCRs are innocuous, such as the one I signed to share the cost of maintaining the short dirt road with the other 5 homeowners on that road. Others can prevent you from doing just about anything: changing the color of your house, what plants you can have outside, banning almost all antennas (which, as a ham radio operator, I would reject outright), and many other things.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @etherealearthhomestead Thanks for the link. Good article. Something that the environmental groups should be lobbying for here in North America. We have the Green Party here in Canada but I don't recall any of their candidates promoting the idea of green roof construction for new buildings.

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    When I bought my house I took out what little grass there was and created planters, beside not wanting the hassle of grass I also did not want the water bill that goes with it (I live in So. Calif.)

  • Ethereal Earth
    Ethereal Earth Posts: 142 ✭✭✭

    @catherine.james I am moving to CA this winter (more apartment living) but will be saving to purchase land. Definitely something I will be on the lookout for.


    @Lisa K Where in SoCal? I will be moving to San Diego area.

  • Ruth Ann Reyes
    Ruth Ann Reyes Posts: 577 admin

    A L L ... T H E ... T I M E ... 😂

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited June 2020

    @lmrebert I am in North County - San Diego and most of my neighbors have gardeners too so I keep all of my food and medicine garden in the backyard including roses that I want to us, in the front I grow my flowers for bouquets in the front. Also my Milkweed seems to prefer the front yard so I grow it close to my front door so it is kept away from my neighbors. Some day I hope to have more lan.

    Love the trellis! 😀

  • lmrebert
    lmrebert Posts: 363 ✭✭✭✭

    @Lisa K sounds nice, its a really nice climate there!!

  • Grounded
    Grounded Posts: 153 ✭✭✭

    I find myself looking at lawns, empty lots, unused greenhouses, just about any empty un-utilized space all the time.

    There is an existing business model using other people's property to garden, sharing a portion with the property owner and harvesting the remainder for yourself/local food pantries.

  • annbeck62
    annbeck62 Posts: 1,024 ✭✭✭✭

    Yes, all the time

  • sarah785
    sarah785 Posts: 10 ✭✭✭

    'It’s up to each of us to re-wild our world, piece by piece until we have a patchwork quilt of sanctuaries that wraps its way around the globe'

    This is a lovely quote from an Irish woman who has a website called wearetheark.com which I find inspiring. It is all about giving as much land back into nature's hands which will help protect natural wildlife and habitats. I don't mind seeing patches of land growing wild but it would be great to see more organic growing and wild gardens instead of the emphasis being on manicured lawns. In Ireland, and I'm sure other parts of the world our bees are in decline. 'Rewilding' and encouraging the building of community gardens and allotments in these unused spaces would be fantastic!

  • Ethereal Earth
    Ethereal Earth Posts: 142 ✭✭✭

    I watched a free into to permaculture webinar hosted by High Sierra Permaculture and he mentioned how he would work on others land and be able to have some space for himself to grow food. There are also farm exchanges or farm work exchanges. I read about it in Mother Earth News but I cannot recall exactly what it is called or which issue it was in, unfortunately.

  • Noel Davey
    Noel Davey Posts: 30 ✭✭✭

    Yes land of good soil need to have food growing in it. Lawns are great to sit on , look at but give little back of substance.