strawberry jelly

Nancy Carter
Nancy Carter Posts: 202 ✭✭✭
edited October 2020 in General Recipes

what are your strawberry jelly recipe tips and techniques?

Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @cartern72 I have never made strawberry jelly but have made lots of strawberry jam. The seeds are so small on strawberries, there isn't much point in straining out the juice to have jelly. The jam is pretty smooth. Now blackberries are a different story. Larger seeds so I would make a jelly rather than a jam. Same with saskatoons; jelly not jam. Just my opinion.

  • Nancy Carter
    Nancy Carter Posts: 202 ✭✭✭

    What are saskatoons? Have you made raspberry sauce/glaze? For your strawberry jam what ratio of strawberries to sugar do you perfer?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @cartern72 Saskatoons are also known as June Berries or Service Berries. Amelanchier alnifolia in the Rosaceae family. They are fairly common in the Northwestern States through BC into Alaska. They are common on the Canadian Prairies so am assuming they can be found across the border in the same habitat. Not sure how far south they go but my info suggests into Colorado and Arizona.

    When I make jams or jellies, I don't use any commercial pectin. If pectin is required, I make my own from apple peels & cores or lemon pips and peel. So my recipe is usually 1 cup of fruit puree to one cup of sugar. I rarely make jam anymore because of the sugar content. It is made as a special treat. Jellies are usually made as a condiment with the exception of Oregon Grape Jelly. It is one of the finest wild jellies I have ever had and it is one I make when there is a good harvest, as one of those treats for special occasions. My husband likes red currant jelly with his chicken and turkey as a replacement for cranberry sauce. Which is handy cause I have red currants in my garden but no cranberries.

    I do make a combination raspberry/cherry preserve with port wine added. I use that as a glaze on ham or duck. Yummy! Good drizzle over a bit of homemade ice cream, too. That came about trying to use up some of my cherry harvest. Black, sour cherries.

  • Nancy Carter
    Nancy Carter Posts: 202 ✭✭✭

    All of these sound delicious! Your raspberry/cherry port wine glaze especially! We do not use store bought pectin, we have been using lemon juice and adding zest ! To be honest I am now sure I have been making strawberry jam not jelly!!

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree with @torey that strawberry jam is easy and it's better to go with that rather than with jelly.

    I use the strawberry jam recipe in Sherri Brooks Vinton's excellent book "Put Em Up!" It's easy and works well. The nice thing about her recipes is that they are fairly low-sugar because they use Pomona's Universal Pectin instead of the more common Sure-Jell and similar types. Pomona's is harder to find, but it can be ordered online, and lets you use less sugar. This is not only healthier, but it lets you taste the fruit instead of being overwhelmed with cloying sweetness.

    (I have no financial interest in Vinton's books. I'm just a very satisfied purchaser.)

  • annbeck62
    annbeck62 Posts: 1,023 ✭✭✭✭

    I make a very untraditional version using chia seeds. I blend the strawberries and then add the chia to thicken. I use fresh picked strawberries so I don't add extra sugar but you could if you wanted. I store in the refrigerator.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @annbeck62 Welcome to TGN!

    Just a few weeks ago, I came across a recipe for Raw Strawberry Jam using chia seeds. I haven't had a chance to try it yet as local strawberries aren't ready, nor have I seen any wild ones yet. But it is on my list of things to do.

  • kfoto
    kfoto Posts: 108 ✭✭✭
    edited June 2020

    I use sure jell light or ball low sugar or no sugar pectin with consistent results. Pomom’s is hit and miss. Always add a lemon juice or lime juice to hold jams color. Strawberry jam is the easiest to make.

  • John
    John Posts: 163 ✭✭✭

    Haven't grown strawberries for a few years now. Getting ready to plant some and have the area plotted out in my backyard garden area. Any ideas on current ways to plant care for and use these remarkable fruits?

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @John I find them so easy to grow that it's hard to give helpful advice.

    My biggest problem is that the fruits are prone to rotting when they get damp or wet, so growing them too densely is not a good idea. If you have enough land, space them out at least a foot apart, and more is better. I grow mine intensely in raised beds of excellent soil, with the plants only a few inches apart. The plants are happy, but controlling mold under those circumstances is a constant battle. It's a good idea to harvest every day at the peak of the season.

    In spite of the mold issue, I've harvested enough fruit from 3 beds to make a dozen jars of jam and eat a good bit of fresh fruit besides.

    You can eat them fresh, freeze them as soon as possible after picking, make strawberry jam in a water bath canner, or dehydrate them for use on cereal or salad. I do all four. Strawberries are an extremely versatile fruit.

  • marcy_northlightsfarm
    marcy_northlightsfarm Posts: 103 ✭✭✭

    I also use Pamona's Universal Pectin for all my jams. I usually use 1 1/2 to 2 cups organic sugar to 4 cups mashed berries plus the calcium water and pectin per the Pamona recipe. This year I cleared out my freezer of frozen strawberries plus picked some fresh and made 35 pints of strawberry jam using this recipe.