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Masterwort! Peucedanum ostrutium. Have you ever tried it out? Do you use it as your home medicine? — The Grow Network Community
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Masterwort! Peucedanum ostrutium. Have you ever tried it out? Do you use it as your home medicine?

jolanta.wittibjolanta.wittib Posts: 438 ✭✭✭✭
edited October 2020 in Growing Medicinals

Masterwort Root - my favourite Home Medicine for sore throat, toothaches, digestion problems, cold, infections....

 It grows high up in the Alps - from around 1700 m high and likes wet places.

The root certainly deserves its name “master”. It has a very intense and specific scent and I use it in so many different ways. Here in the Alps schnapps has been distilled from the roots and used as a stomach tonic. I do not have to buy this Schnaps. I make my own Masterwort root tincture. It is a nice Digestive, I have to say 😊.

I use diluted tincture for rinsing mouth, if I have some problems, or, simply for preventing problems.

my favourite medicine is a slice of dried root for sore throat. It is very simple to make those slices: I just clean the root and cut it into small slices, dry them and keep in a tightly closed jar. Whenever I have a sore throat, or as a prevention, I would keep one piece in my mouth throughout the night and in the morning the sore is gone. 

It soothes toothaches as well.

Anyone who has ever seen Masterwort root will remember the claw at the end of the root. It could also be a reason why houses and stables used to be fumigated with dried and burned roots. Not only the smell, but also the claws protected against witches and devils 😊

I know. One should dig roots in autumn or spring, but then, up in the mountains they are already under snow. That is why, I have to get my supply in summer. 


Comments

  • toreytorey Posts: 2,781 admin

    @jolanta.wittib Thank you so much for posting about this! I did not know anything about this plant species. When I saw the picture, I wondered if was an Apiaceae family member and sure enough, it is. Osha is another Apiaceae family member that grows as high altitude in North America that is very good for respiratory illnesses..

    A fellow homeopath/herbalist friend and I were having a conversation just yesterday about high altitude plants from around the world that are used to treat respiratory illnesses.

    So off I go to do more research into this gem.

  • jolanta.wittibjolanta.wittib Posts: 438 ✭✭✭✭

    @torey Thank you. It is interesting how thoughts are connecting people wherever they are on this planet. You were having a conversation, I was thinking and collecting... There are so many useful plants growing high. I am using quite a lot and I will write one by one about my experience with Arnica Montana, Valeriana Montana, Gentiana lutea, Usnea, cetraria islandica, Linus cembra. Mountains are full of treasures which I do not know, so I would be excited and grateful to read about experiences of others in using plants growing high.

  • toreytorey Posts: 2,781 admin

    @jolanta.wittib I am looking forward to your thoughts on usnea. It is prolific in my area. I use it as a tincture for infections and lung issues.

  • aurora.rebeccaaurora.rebecca Posts: 62 ✭✭✭

    Wow! Thanks for the info I had recently ran across the name of this plant and my interest was piqued. Thanks for all the info and pictures!

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