Horseradish greens?

Paradox
Paradox Posts: 187 ✭✭✭
edited October 2020 in General Recipes

Anyone have suggestions for what to do with horseradish greens? (besides compost) They are ginormous leaves--18-24" long/tall. Making hubby dig up what he can of the roots. These are legacy from the ONE horseradish we planted back in 2005, I think it was. (we also have a shipload of apple mint that also resulted from a single plant that year.)

Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    @Paradox If you get them early in the year they are great added to salads. By the time they get this big, they are starting to get a bit tough and quite strong in flavour. Not sure if they could be for something like cabbage rolls in place of the cabbage. Might be a bit strong for that, too. I add them in small quantities to broths with the rest of the end of season garden produce.

    Horseradish will do that. If you leave just a bit of toot in the ground you will have new plants. Same with apple mint. It is one of the more invasive mints I have grown.

  • Paradox
    Paradox Posts: 187 ✭✭✭

    yeah, wish I had known that when I bought the seedling! Oh my gosh.. when we came back from two years in GA in 2010, the apple mint was absolutely COVERING a 20' x 20' area. in just a few years. 10 years later, we're still fighting that, buckthorn, thistle, burdock... Sigh.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    @Paradox At least they are all useful, even if they are a bit of a nuisance.

  • Paradox
    Paradox Posts: 187 ✭✭✭

    Useful..... well.... I'm not sure what use there is for thistles, other than the deep tap roots. Burdock, I suppose, if i was prone to gout and cared to harvest the roots. It does to a good job covering the soil in the back where little grows due to shade and neglect. Buckthorn.... nah. I don't think it's useful.

  • soeasytocraft
    soeasytocraft Posts: 237 ✭✭✭

    A friend of mine wraps roasts in for baking. She really likes it. Might have to give it a try myself one day.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    @Paradox Thistles (Cirsium species) have astringent and antibacterial properties. Depending on the species, they have several other uses as well, including lowering of blood glucose and cholesterol levels. At least 2 thistles species are edible when young. Burdock is an excellent alterative for many other conditions besides gout. Often found in detox recipes. Buckthorns, again depending on the species, have useful properties, primarily as laxatives or purgatives. Sea buckthorn's berries are very high in Vitamin C.

    @soeasytocraft What a great idea! I'm going to try that with the next roast I do.