Mustard, senf... mmmm

Ferg
Ferg Posts: 285 ✭✭✭
edited October 2020 in General Recipes

Ok, I'm having a mustard craving. There are a couple commercial products out there that I love, and making it myself is fine, but what I seek from You All Marvelous People are...

recipes. Snacks, dips, sauces, marinades... featuring mustard. I'm a polish or german mustard kinda person, if that matters, but here I am... begging for recipes.


(because otherwise I will just eat it out of the jar with a spoon)

Comments

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin
    edited September 2020

    I'd just have it with kielbasa r ham and kraut... but you can make a nice French cream sauce with mustard and serve over fish. Right now, I'd rather have dome grilled good hotdogs though, kraut, onions and mustard... maybe some chili. I have a great home made hot pretzel recipe somewhere... Oh, Cornichons (little dill pickles) wrapped in ham and cheese are very nice with good mustard.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    As usual, Alton (fellow UGA alum), goes over board with details... but this is close to what I do https://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/homemade-soft-pretzels-recipe-1948242

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,519 admin
    edited September 2020

    Just a note on how to say kielbasa. The Ukrainians, in the area where I grew up, that produce the sausage on a regular basis, pronounce it "koo-baa-saw" accent on the "koo". So many people (including some non-Ukrainians here) just anglicize it rather than finding out the true pronunciation.

    Sorry, @Ferg I have nothin' for ya. :( But that is an interesting craving.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    Ohh.... I never could quite catch how my Ukrainian friends said it..... there is something they do with the back of their throat or tongue. I know one thing for sure... if a Ukrainian cooks it, it is GOOD! My dear friend, Yulia, sent me so many wonderful recipes! If I ever leave the state, no doubt, I'm heading for Poland and/or Ukraine.

  • Ferg
    Ferg Posts: 285 ✭✭✭
    edited September 2020

    heheheh the Milwaukee Poles called it like the city Kiel. my father's family was from Pomern, which is an area that constantly was being traded between Germany and Poland. I though the words I knew were English until I went to Uni and met the Russian Jews who told me that I was speaking something very much like Yiddish and Polish combined. There was a Polish deli on Lawnguyland near where I lived. The entire wall of the place was a sausage display, behind glass. Sooooo many kinds of wurst it was amazing. My favorite though is the Krakaw sausage. At weihnachstfeste I would head straight for the Wurst tent and get that, mushrooms, and pommes. ermagerd. The mustard plus grilled krakaw on an authentic german roll.... darn. I'm a bit homesickish....

    My favorite borscht is Ukrainian style. It has LOTS of stuff in it, not just beets. It was great when the CSA share was wayyyyyyyy too much, so I'd make a vat of borscht and freeze it.

    more homesickish....

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin
    edited September 2020

    I've had several good Polish and Ukrainian friends - Germans, Romanians, etc. My tastes seem to run in a Slavic direction, and my "nature" is such that folks from that region seem to "get me". It is hard to explain, but Waylon Jennings and Willie Nelson sang a song, "Them that don't know him won't like him and them that do sometimes won't know how to take him. He ain't wrong, he's just different and his pride won't let him do the things to make you think he's right." Eastern European folks are proud, strong, intelligent and very willing to fight for what they believe. A few years ago, I met a Ukrainian girl working at a bank. She was a "barbie doll" of course... but very pregnant and married. So, we chatted about food... her parents were chefs in Germany. I guess I kept saying, "I dated a girl from ____ (some Balkan country usually) for a while and her grandmother taught me this recipe.." She asked, "Why do you love eastern European women"... in the aggressively sexy way only Eastern European women have, even though she was very pregnant. I answered, Because they are smart, they appreciate men who are men and good food... and they are unpredictable..." She thought for a second and said, "Yes, unpredictable... ready to argue over anything!" My friend, Yullia is half Russian, so she's shared some fantastic traditional Russian recipes with me, as well. I love her very much as my best friend. Often times, almost all my friends have been European Jews or rural Black Protestants... Just an hour ago, I was trading recipes for "neck bones and onions with rice" with a dear old black lady at the grocery store. I never fit anywhere... but I eat well! Yulia told me that they have a tradition that any stranger who comes to town is invited to eat with a family. The youngest daughter sits by his side and makes him feel welcome. She serves him Cherry brandy. She serves any man who visits cherry brandy. Now, I'm the kind of big ole hillbiilly who just melts over kids... and I do love cherry brandy... I told her that if I ever visited Ukraine, I'd go house to house and never leave!

  • Ferg
    Ferg Posts: 285 ✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 your people are just scattered about, like most gems.

    One lab I worked had a predominant number of eastern european descendent women. The running joke from our group, when other groups saw us lugging pallets of crap and rearranging the furniture was that we were "sturdy women. we get things done".

    on top of that our group got more done in the science arena than the rest too.

  • OhiohillsLouise
    OhiohillsLouise Posts: 120 ✭✭✭

    You are making me drool. I loved my Polish grandmothers cooking kielbasa, mustard, sauerkraut, sausage, pastry that wasn’t too sweet, hardy soups ... Many years after she died I asked my Polish aunt (grandmothers daughter-in-law) for that Polish lentil soup recipe, she informed me it was a German recipe from grandmother’s German grandmother. My daughter did the Ancestry test, yup the German showed up.

    Regarding pronunciation we always said kielbasa with an “e” sound at the end. But that could be the east coast accent coming out of me. Lol

  • OhiohillsLouise
    OhiohillsLouise Posts: 120 ✭✭✭

    Sorry I got caught up in the food memories... one of the ways I use mustard is as a roast beef rub, a little garlic, salt pepper, olive oil and mustard. Rub roast, cook as usual, and serve with some horseradish.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    That is good stuff! I do that sometimes, too - really good!

  • I want to grow mustard next year for the seeds to make mustard. Also the greens some, but mainly the mustard. Have any of you'all done this?

  • Ferg
    Ferg Posts: 285 ✭✭✭
    edited September 2020

    Germany and Poland share borders; Poland used to be HUUUUUGE, so it's no wonder that many of the recipes are claimed by both cultures (-: The German City-States (what we'd call countries now if they existed today) were prominent traders.

    Even today, Usedom, the playground Island of the Prussian Aristocracy located in Pommern, is half Poland and half Germany. Best fish soup ever.

  • Wendy
    Wendy Posts: 138 ✭✭✭

    Equal portions of mustard and grape jelly, melted, as a marinade for sausage slices. Its best heated in a crock pot.