Delicious decorative quince fruit (chaenomeles)

Quinces - treasure of the garden: beautiful blossoms in spring, delicious fruit in autumn

Middle September. Every evening I cut quinces while watching TV. And it lasts for almost a week. One activity contributes to another: it is boring to watch TV and it is boring to cut quinces, but both together are a nice combination. We have never had so many quinces - I harvested 5 buckets. I am sure that we shall appreciate that later in the year, when all the fresh fruit from garden is gone. 

One cannot eat them raw. They are too sour. But I know how to make something delicious out of them: I slice them thinly, cover with sugar 1:1, leave overnight, next day the slices are already swimming in a lot of own juice. I warm them to 70 C as I want them not only to be delicious, but also not to loose the valuable Vitamin C which vanishes with boiling. Then I let it cool down and after some time I heat it up again. The longer the slices stay in syrup the more sweetness they duck in. I separate quince slices from syrup. The slices are like bonbons. There is always a danger to eat too many. Everybody likes them. Syrup keeps well and one can use it for drinks, even alcoholic ones as syrup gives a nice flavour and taste to whatever you add it to. 

And it is rich not only in Vitamin C, it is also rich in kalium, iron, copper..

Sugar, of course, is no good, so one has to eat self made bonbons in moderation. 


Comments

  • herbantherapy
    herbantherapy Posts: 453 ✭✭✭✭

    @jolanta.wittib Thank you for sharing this!!! Chanomeles is my favorite shrub!!! I had a huge patch at a farm I stayed at once. And I have been trying to obtain one to grow at home for years to no avail.

    I have never had the pleasure of tasting their fruit but I hope to one day. I have a tattoo of Chanomeles ‘sangria’ from my shoulder to my waist that covers one side of my back; it was a graduation present to myself when I got my degree in horticulture.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    This post has inspired me to look into growing quince here. Its a bit iffy for me as it is a zone 5-9 plant. But if I put it in a sheltered location, it might survive. I have already looked up a source to get one. I will probably buy two as it says they are self-fertile but harvest increases with a pollinator.

    Thought I would check out the medicinal properties of quince as I knew nothing about it. The following is from a blog post at the East West School of Planetary Herbology on Western Quine (Cydonia vulgaris):

    "Listed in Grieve’s A Modern Herbal (from 1931), it is demulcent, astringent and antidiarrheal. The fruit may be made into syrup and taken for diarrhea. The seeds are very mucilaginous and taken internally treat diarrhea and inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Topically, the seeds make a good compress, poultice, ointment, or lotion for burns, chaps, ulcers, cuts, and to soothe the eyes. It can also be used as a mouthwash or gargle for mouth and throat inflammations. Some people use common quince (Cydonia oblonga) interchangeably with C. vulgaris for digestive disorders, diarrhea, coughs, and gastrointestinal inflammation."

    Chinese Quince (Chaenomeles langenaria) has different properties as follows:

    "Also in the Rosaceae family, it’s called mu gua in Chinese and has a warm energy, sour flavor and enters the Liver and Spleen channels. It is considered an herb to dispel Wind-Damp conditions, particularly in the joints and extremities. The dried fruit is used to move the Blood through the channels, relax the muscles and tendons, transform Dampness and harmonize the Stomach. It is anti-rheumatic, anti-inflammatory, laxative, analgesic, and astringent. Chinese quince is especially effective for the lower limbs, treating ligament pains, congestion of the blood and nerve channels, weakness in the lower back and extremities, severe cramping pains, abdominal pains, spasms of the calves, and swelling of the legs. It also unblocks food stagnation, similarly to hawthorn berries. It is generally not given to those with heat and is taken in decoction using 3-12g."

    For those who don't know Latin. The Kalium mentioned in the original post is potassium.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    Just found the following link to a recipe for Membrillo, a jellied paste made from quince. It uses a lot of sugar but it sounds like it would be a nice occasional treat, especially served with a cheese as suggested. There are links to other quince recipes at the bottom of the page.

    https://www.thespruceeats.com/quince-paste-fruit-preserve-1327577

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,349 admin

    @herbantherapy wow! I have never seen a quince tattoo! Well, it is one of my favourite shrubs as well. And the blossoms are really beautiful. My bees love them too 😊

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,349 admin

    @torey thank you very much! Your posts are always full of very useful information and recipes!

    I use quince seeds a lot. Especially for sour throat. Just pour boiling water onto the dried seeds and the slime is very useful for soothing the pain. I will definitely read the information in the links which you have provided. Wonderful!

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,349 admin

    @torey I forgot to mention, that my plants are very resistant to cold. We have harsh winter here with temperatures down to minus 15 -18C and they survive very well and give plenty of fruit. You should give a try 😊

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,395 admin

    @jolanta.wittib Interesting info about the seeds. Good to know how hardy they are. I will definitely be picking up a couple of these in the spring.

  • Elizabeth Voss
    Elizabeth Voss Posts: 57 ✭✭✭

    Thank you @jolanta.wittib - I never liked jelly but this may be a hit for me. never knew what to do with these buys but there are super easy to grow around here - so what a nice little treat. Those picture are a huge help for me, extra hug for that!

  • Elizabeth Voss
    Elizabeth Voss Posts: 57 ✭✭✭

    Thank yo u@torey - I use spruce eats quite often, kow them to be a good source.

  • Gail H
    Gail H Posts: 359 ✭✭✭✭

    @torey Yes, go for two plants if you get quince. We had one for years and it never produced fruit. It wasn't until I asked the guy at the local jewelry shop if I could pick some quince from the bushes in front of his store and started plants from those seeds that I started getting fruit.

    I'm glad that I asked about the fruit. The business has since changed hands and the new owner ripped out the quince bushes. I live near a town that was settled in the 1600's so I have no idea how old a variety the quince was. I feel like I did my bit for preserving a local treasure. :o)