Cookbooks

dimck421
dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭
edited October 2020 in General Recipes

I collect cookbooks, the older the better. It intrigues me how food trends change. Even the use of certain products change...Oleo for example. Does Oleo still exist? Some books include stories to accompany the recipe. Some include a little history of the person submitting the recipe. Does anyone else collect cookbooks?

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Comments

  • naomi.kohlmeier
    naomi.kohlmeier Posts: 380 ✭✭✭

    Yes @dimck421 I love collecting cookbooks. I have my grandmother's cookbook from 1879? It has some wonderful recipes and hints and tricks for the home. I've tried one of the cookie recipes ~ delicious! ~ learned what saleratus is, it's baking soda, found out the temperature of the wood burning oven was right for cakes when you could hold your arm in it to the count of 10 and right for pies and such to the count of five. Who knew? I like that butter was measured as the size of an egg, and did you know that you can make a fly trap with cream and brown sugar? The flies go for the sugar and get bogged down in the cream. Not a pleasant thing, but then neither are biting flies.

    I also collect cookbooks on fermented foods.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    Yes, I collect cook books - got tons and the old ones are the best! If memory serves, oleo was a brand name for margarine. Unfortunately, margarine does still exist. Oddly, though, it used to be pink by law - butter companies demanded that so it couldn't be passed off as counterfeit butter!

  • Linda Bittle
    Linda Bittle Posts: 1,515 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I collect them, too. It's an eclectic bunch.

    I have some old ones, a bunch of classics (Betty Crocker, Better Homes and Gardens, etc), and a bunch of newer ones, too. Heavy on the Southern style of cooking, and newer ones that harken back to the older style of cooking. (Jill Winger, Melissa Norris, etc.). I also have a big section on cooking wild game.

    And a couple of baskets of the old recipe pamphlets that I've picked up for free ever since I was a kid.

    I even cook using recipes from my favorites.

    I'm trying to weed out the books that don't actually have any recipes that I intend to make...but I have a hard time getting rid of books.

  • Granny Marie
    Granny Marie Posts: 53 ✭✭✭

    My sister does the cookbook collecting. I have about 10. But, mine are fixed. I put stars by the good recipes and nothing by the others. I also put notes and substitutions for future cooks.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,519 admin

    I have Company's Coming cookbooks, 4 large Mennonite cookbooks (and some smaller Amish ones), a few of my Grandma's cookbooks & a few other misc. on important things like coffee, chocolate, ice creams & cheesecakes.

    I hope to one day get my mom's Five Roses Flour cookbook, but due to recent events, I doubt that I will be the recipient. I think it is wanted by quite a few others anyway.

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @LaurieLovesLearning I hope whatever recent events, of which you speak, quickly become something of the past. I was not sure what Five Roses Flour cookbooks were, so I looked it up. Oh, yes, they do look like treasures! No doubt, it belonging to your mom would make it even more so a treasure.

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @Marie Grace you turned your books into text books! Good idea! I made something of an index for mine. Some recipes are real go to's, and I have them in an index, stating book and page. Some I have based on an ingredient.

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @Mary Linda Bittle you bunch sounds a lot like mine! Substitute "game" for vegetarian. lol I landed a way old book from the 4H Club. It has to be one of my favorites. Second favorite was the churches in the area created a regular who is who of the kitchen sort of book. I quite enjoy those recipes.

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 Wow. I never knew margarine was once pink. I never cook with it or Crisco, though Crisco did do something nice for oatmeal cookies. Then I educated myself on the two products. Frightening information.

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @naomi.kohlmeier I have a book like that too! lol It measures ingredients via the coffee cup. I have some massive coffee cups, so I am guessing that is not what the writer of the recipe mean. I love some of the terms...sweet milk, for example. My grandma used that term, so the book often makes me think of her. She never used a recipe though. She said measurin' just hasta feel right. Seemed to work well for her!

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    Yeah, it really is. I agree that shortening does sometimes result in a nicer texture, but I can't use it anymore due to that.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    PS. be sure to pick up a copy of "The Virginia Housewife" by Mary Randolph - first cookbook published in America, by a distant ancestor of mine

  • VickiP
    VickiP Posts: 586 ✭✭✭✭

    Yes! I also like the old ones. Another type I am fond of are the local ones. I am sure everyone has seen them. They are put out by churches, clubs, schools etc. I really like the tried and true recipes they contain.

  • KimWilson
    KimWilson Posts: 197 ✭✭✭

    A few days ago, while cleaning out storage, I found a few precious pages from a scrapbook of my mother's favorite recipes.

  • nksunshine27
    nksunshine27 Posts: 343 ✭✭✭

    i have about 40 cookbooks. i'm always looking for ones that help me cook with a wood cookstove.

    @dimck421 and @judsoncarroll4 my great grandma use to use crisco for her pie crust, but then they changed the recipe. i use lard in recipes that call for crisco. and i dont use margerine but butter.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin
  • shllnzl
    shllnzl Posts: 1,820 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dimck421 @judsoncarroll4 I grew up in Wisconsin, the dairy state. People had to go to Illinois to buy margarine, done because the cost was way cheaper. I distinctly remember breaking the color dot (yellow with pink spot) to knead the color into the white, Crisco looking stuff. No one knew how unhealthy the stuff was/is.

    Even today, there is no awareness of how unhealthy the modern "food" items are. We are prone to trusting our food supply.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    That is very true. I have to go to SC just to buy raw milk. The grocery stores in NC won't carry anything but ultra pasteurized. I have repeatedly asked for just pasteurized instead - they look at me like I'm crazy. THey think the word ultra makes it better, when in truth, it is lower quality.

  • NarjissMomOf3
    NarjissMomOf3 Posts: 113 ✭✭✭

    Nourising traditions is also a very good book. The author is Sally falon.

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Definitely! I have well over 100 of them, some old, some new, some new that have recipes for long ago ... definitely.

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭

    I do too. I have six hard copy and they are all recent except for one that I think is 15 years old. I have I don't know how many electronic ones saved to my computer (I need to go through them at some point). One of my books is all about cocktails though.

  • KimMullen
    KimMullen Posts: 38 ✭✭✭

    I collect them too! I have over 100. I love the old cookbook that talk about the lost ways of doing things. Our forefathers knew so much!

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 I ran straight to Amazon. What an intriguing book! There was an option to peruse the inside of the book, which I did. I will grab a copy! Thank you for letting me know. Being from Virginia, it's a fun purchase!

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @torey I have the Lodge book! Love it!

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @shllnzl I once loved margarine on certain foods, like biscuits. Now, I can't believe I ever ate it, relative of plastic, it is!

  • dimck421
    dimck421 Posts: 203 ✭✭✭

    @nksunshine27 when you mentioned lard, it made me recall once using my granny's recipe for oatmeal cookies (too yummy!). The recipe called for Crisco. I realized Crisco was a BAD thing, so I used lard. Oh man, butter would have been a much better substitution. Nothing like bacon oatmeal cookies! lol The texture was awesome, but I really could not work with the flavor.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @nksunshine27 Silly me. Just realized that the link I gave you was for turnips, not the cookbook. Here is the correct link. https://www.amazon.com/Barbaras-Woodstove-Cookbook-Barbara-Leckenby/dp/0896360814

  • nksunshine27
    nksunshine27 Posts: 343 ✭✭✭

    @dimck421 bacon grease and lard are different. bacon grease has its place and i save it when frying eggs or frying vegies i want to have bacon flavor. but lard is leaf fat rendered so it doesnt taste like bacon cause its not from cured meat. so you might want to try the recipe again with actual lard.

    @torey thankyou i will be looking those up

  • Brindy
    Brindy Posts: 212 ✭✭✭

    I love cookbooks! I love cooking! I don't have meat as many as y'all do. I probably have about 40 or 50. Probably my favorites are the Make a Mix cookbooks. I used them so often as a kid and I love the recipes. Unfortunately almost all of the mixes use crisco so I haven't used them in years. I'm wondering if lard would work. Is lard shelf stable?

  • Sheila
    Sheila Posts: 108 ✭✭✭

    I have cookbooks from my Grandma and my husband's Grandma as well as the ones I have picked up at garage sales and 2nd hand books. Love the local books and anything to do with baking. I am not exactly sure how many books I have as I quit counting after 200. Every one has been read and I refer back to many of them for answers to questions that come up while baking or cooking.