Bought a 50 acre farm!!!!

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Comments

  • Acequiamadre
    Acequiamadre Posts: 269 ✭✭✭

    Congrats!

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    Here’s the barn! And next, the loft.

    There’s a door behind the staircase that opens up to the barn.

    And here’s the view from the barn that I fell in love with.

    And here’s my sister with the goat I picked up today. She’s HUGE. It probably wasn’t a decision in keeping with my resolve to take it slowly. She’s. So. Big!!!!

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 Well, that was quite a list, but I’m starting with The Carolina Housewife and The Cultural Life of the American Colonies by Louis B. Wright. I ordered those and I’ll start on the gardening series put out by Clemson tonight. THANK YOU! :)

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,518 admin

    Lovely pictures! It's certainly not the hiproof barn that I had pictured. lol

    With those box stalls, you could make awesome rooms, and possibly a fun extended loft area over those...or just keep using it or a portion of it as a barn. But, I would be quite wary of rodents, especially mice, if you did keep part of it as an attached barn.

    With the living area right beside the barn, it is similar to the housebarn that I mentioned. It is nice that you have living quarters as you work on your project further.

    You will have to keep us updated.

    I have absolutely no experience with goats, so I'm out on that one!

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    @LaurieLovesLearning Thank you as usual for all the advice and encouragement!

  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Yep, those are box stalls. Depending on the size, that's a big barn. It looks like it was built as a standard pole barn. It's not a gable roof. Anyway, you get to have fun with drawing paper to plan.

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    And today I may have killed my new goat. I let her eat mountain laurel. I’ve never heard of it before, but then I’m not familiar with any of the flora here. Apparently it’s related to azaleas and extremely toxic. The learning curve is STEEP!!!!

    @RustBeltCowgirl Thank you, now I know what a box stall is!

  • tilathehunn
    tilathehunn Posts: 168 ✭✭✭

    I am so envious, congratulations

  • Owl
    Owl Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

    Congratulations! I’m so excited for you! I’m (sort of) the owner of a new farm about the size of your and I have lots and lots of ideas about things I want to do including an orchard, areas for growing mushrooms, rabbits, greenhouse, chickens and milk goats. I’m in my third year and I still have to force myself to take my time. My first order of business after getting chickens for my existing coop was to observe the land and where the sun shines through the seasons. I wanted to figure out where the winds were going and what areas the sun shines on during its yearly cycles. This made me more able to figure out where the different elements should go and gave me time to test and amend the soil as needed. I like Justin Rhodes newsletter and videos. I haven’t been able to join his group but I have learned a tremendous amount from his newsletter, video blog and, especially the “great American farm tour” that his family went on several years ago. I’m pretty sure it’s still on YouTube. In it he highlighted what some wonderful farms are successfully doing so we can mimic them. Salatin’s farm was hugely highlighted as Justin is a follower of his methods.

    Be sure to slow down enough to savor every moment instead of working yourself into burnout. Each moment is so precious!

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Great pictures what a wonderful adventure!!!

  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Megan Venturella How's the goat? Maybe she only ate enough to make her ill.

  • DurwardPless
    DurwardPless Posts: 162 ✭✭✭

    I took the challenge of building a house when first married. My wife and I did everything but dig the basement hole. The building went on for years. It seemed like all I did was work, sleep, and eat. It was not a pleasant experience, but made me patient, strong, strong willed, and knowledgeable. Would I do it again? Maybe.

    DDP

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    @Owl I’ll have to go back and watch more of Justin Rhodes’ stuff now that it isn’t just theoretical! Good for you for taking the time, I know it’s going to kill me, LOL. But like you said, it’s a precious time and we are forming family memories, so I have to savor it.

    @RustBeltCowgirl I nearly did kill her. She threw up all day and we found a vet who came and gave her activated charcoal and mineral oil with a feeding tube. She’s so big she nearly took him for a ride trying to get away. She was so miserable, but praise God she made it through the night and I think she’s going to make it. Whew! Mountain laurel was the culprit.

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    @DurwardPless Duly noted! We will hire help for the tough work of the remodel. I’m not very handy, so while I’m happy to do painting and fencing I sure know my limits! But I’m so impressed that you did it ALL. Wow.

  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Glad to hear that she might do okay.

  • spanthegulf
    spanthegulf Posts: 81 ✭✭✭

    @Megan Venturella Congratulations!!!! Your family is embarking on a grand adventure! Here is a link to a video that I found particularly helpful... a "things to know before you dive in over your head" sort of thing... very practical. Hope you find it helpful!

    https://homesteadingfamily.com/how-to-buy-a-homestead-property/

  • MissPatricia
    MissPatricia Posts: 318 ✭✭✭

    Fifty acres sounds wonderful. We have 8 /2, but other than selling our trees (what a mess), we haven't used most. I do have gardens near the house and am grateful for that. I have heard plenty of cautions not to get in over your heads, but to prioritize and do what is most important first. Nice you have a barn.

  • NarjissMomOf3
    NarjissMomOf3 Posts: 113 ✭✭✭

    Love the view, wow!

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    One of the books recommended by @judsoncarroll4 came in today. The Carolina Housewife. I sat down to read through the intro, and it turns out there is some very valuable information in there! I’ll have my goat read it. ;)

    CAN YOU BELIEVE THAT??? But of course even if I’d read this a few days ago, I still wouldn’t have known what mountain laurel looks like. Well, I know now!

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    Mountain laurel is an azalea, although rhododendron is often called by the same name. They are mildly toxic but, rhododendron is also mildly narcotic.... so kids taking too much and getting sick enough to be hospitalized is not uncommon. Carolina Housewife is a VERY good cookbook. I'm sure you'll enjoy it. If you can, get a copy of the Virginia Housewife, as well... both were written by ladies to whom I'm very distantly related... once includes the first Southern Fried Chicken recipe!

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,518 admin

    @judsoncarroll4 Just who aren't you related to? It amazes me. Knowledge abounds.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin
    edited October 2020

    Hard to say. I'm just glad I don't have 6 toes on each foot! There really were not many families here when my ancestors started out... my family tree is full of spouses who had the same surname before they married. Seriously! That was purposefully done in the "old country"... like if you look at my House of Wessex ancestors....the first kings of England (Edward the Confessor, Richard Lionheart, Ethelred the Unready)... mostly first cousins... but, well at least I don't have ears like Prince Charles! But, to be clear, I'm not directly descendent of either of the cookbook authors - just related through marriage.

  • sudborough
    sudborough Posts: 36 ✭✭✭

    Congratulations to you on your new adventure & that your new goat survived her mountain laurel encounter! Keep us posted on your progress!

  • marcy_northlightsfarm
    marcy_northlightsfarm Posts: 103 ✭✭✭

    Make sure to check with zoning before making plans to remodel. Maybe you'll be lucky and there won't be any. Where I live they have way too many rules! Good luck with the pasture. If it's all pasture you should look into rotational grazing. That's what we do. We graze 65 Holsteins from mama milkers down to 6 month old calves. You could always rent the pasture, or part of it the first season. That way the weeds will be kept down and you can watch how it's managed.

  • rbusby01
    rbusby01 Posts: 115 ✭✭✭

    So happy for ya'll Megan. An amazing adventure begins:)

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    @marcy_northlightsfarm There is someone who comes right now to cut and bale the hay, but we’d like to get animals on it soon. Do you use electric fencing? Do you have any books or YouTube videos you’d recommend for me? Thank you!

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,518 admin

    I could suggest a good book for a home dairy cow. Just let me know.

  • annflancan
    annflancan Posts: 84 ✭✭✭

    Thank you for the pictures, you have a beautiful piece of property. Were is it roughly located?

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    @annflancan Thank you! It’s in Lancaster, SC.

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    @LaurieLovesLearning Ibwould love a recommendation on a book for a home dairy cow. I’m reading Keeping a Family Cow by Joann S. Grohman. I love it, but put it down because I was getting so enthusiastic and I’m not living at the barn yet. Hopefully the remodel starts in 2-3 weeks.