High Blood Pressure What kind of herbs are helpful?

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  • Annie Kate
    Annie Kate Posts: 680 ✭✭✭✭

    It sounds like there are many approaches and different ones work for everyone. Congratulations on finding things that work, @DurwardPless and @marjstratton. Thank you for hawthorn reminder @LaurieLovesLearning and for the yummy food list @torey--healthy eating is so delicious, I find. :) And healthy moving makes me feel good even though I cannot do much of it.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,515 admin
    edited December 2020

    I am trying the hibiscus/apple/ceylon cinnamon tea today. I don't know what the ratios were in the tea & don't know the method, so I am using 1 stick real cinnamon, about 1/3 of a regular sized gala apple, and roughly 1 Tbsp. of hibiscus. I will pour the just boiled water over & let it sit, covered, 15 min.

    If this method doesn't do a whole lot, I will try boiling it. My concern, being fresh apple, is that I will end up with a juicy pink apple sauce. 😄

    I can tell you after just adding the water, that it smells beautiful!

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,515 admin
    edited December 2020

    Its tasty, but a bit strong. I think that I need to water it down a little.

    It didnt make applesauce. 😉

    Watered down is a bit nicer.

    We made more with 1/2 the amount. That was good. Some of the kids let theirs sit for 45 minutes. They said that it tasted like apple pie filling (we added no sweetener).

    So, it was a hit!

  • Nicoleburba
    Nicoleburba Posts: 58 ✭✭✭

    @silvertipgrizz You mentioned beet "kvass", I would like to make this beet "kvass". I quite often have high blood pressure. Do you know how to make it?

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DurwardPless SALT is necessary for your body, good clean salt like pink Himalayan. But a very important fact to know regarding salt:

    it is so much about... a ratio between salt and potassium.. potassium is your intracellular and sodium is extracellular..they work together. So a few years ago I bought a book by a cardiologist..when I first graduated from nursing school and got my first nursing job, all I ever heard the cardiologists say regarding salt was...........'watch your sodium intake' so one day when someone I know needed to understand what the heck that meant I started doing searching. This book by this cardiologist teaches that the proper ratio between salt and potassium is around 7parts (potassium)/1 part (sodium). so much food in the stores has the dangerous ingredient 'glutamate', and iodized salt generic regular brands the iodine starts to evaporate (research a long time ago), the minute the box is opened...more about glutamate later..

    The body will not survive without salt..don't be afraid to use it..is very important, just remember the ratio... 7:1.. check out the beans as they have a good ratio, although differ types of dry beans have a slightly diff ratio. bananas, eat them as green as you can stand them because, as they ripen, the sugar content increases..the potassium stays the same..also, by storing them in the fridge in plastic bags, separating them first and packing each in a bag to themselves (keeps the gas from being synergistic thus slows the ripening way down)..then all from that cluster into an outside bag to help/add to the protection from the cold. I've been doing this for about 8 years and the only down side to using this method for me is now that I know my bananas will stay good for around 1.5 weeks depending on how green when put in fridge.........now I sometimes forget them....

    Also, coconut water, some brands have a good ratio around of potassium to sodium at around 7/1...

    Of utmost importance also........statins are worth your research...they are dangerous. And often other ways to lower your cholesterol. The one best way to lower your cardiac risk is to eat healthy fats...ie avocado etc, exercise when you can, as you can, eat nutrient dense foods and avoid process food as they are very high in bad salt and have glutamate that reduces the need for some of the salt but glutamate again is very dangerous. etc.. So the higher (within reason) your good cholesterol, the more offset the bad cholesterol...There is a way you/anyone can asses your cardiovascular event risk:

    A ratio formula, but you have to know your labs: ( another very good reason everyone needs to get copies of health records for every visit...give the doc a couple weeks so they have time to do their thing and that record is in their system so they can run a copy off for you)..most of the time patients should not have to pay for it..

    now the ratio formula:

    fasting Triglyceride mg/dl, divided by HDL cholesterol mg/dl, ie Triglyceride:HDL ratio.

    120 mg/dl divided by 50 mg/dl So, the Triglyceride to HDL ratio is 2 and you want the number to be low. 2 is good. 1 is better.

    So this ratio is a good indicator of cardiovascular incident as well as info on the status of insulin resistance.

    Very important to know...NOT all LDL (bad cholesterol) is bad. It is the DENSE and SMALL particles in the LDL that is dangerous. The test that tells you specifically about your dense/small LDL levels is not offered in most labs so you have to find a lab that offers it. But this ratio is a good method, and most importantly eating healthy fats for the benefit of heart health and brain health...for heart health, again the good off sets the bad.

    About 10 years ago my son in law was handed a script for a statin and he said no, refused it and started on his treadmill and that resulted in good levels in HDL and lowered level of LDL...without statins.

    Here is an article I found today, some of the info I know to be true, some I was unaware of so be sure to research youself as well as I found some sites still claiming statins are good...


    The best to you.

  • Nicoleburba
    Nicoleburba Posts: 58 ✭✭✭

    It is funny, my "normal" blood pressure is about 130-135/75-80. I consider it is normal because I feel good when it is at this level. If my blood pressure falls to "doctor's normal" 116 for Systolic, I feel like I am walking dead. I think, there is some good or bad reason for this. I need to figure it out.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,633 admin

    @Nicoleburba Everyone is different and docs have differing opinions. I recently had my blood pressure taken in a clinical setting which is a rare thing for me. It was 140/80. That is a bit high for me and when I commented on it, I was told they thought that was pretty good for my age and the situation I was going through. If my BP drops below 120 I also feel very weak and light headed.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,457 admin
    edited December 2020

    Valerian, valerian and valerian... got it?

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,515 admin

    Ah, @judsoncarroll4, you're putting us to sleep...

  • Nicoleburba
    Nicoleburba Posts: 58 ✭✭✭

    @torey Thank you for the explanation. I feel better then. May be with the age blood vessels become not so smooth and blood needs to be pushed harder so it gets where it has to go

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 2020

    @Nicoleburba Try having your magnesium level checked and if you know you don't eat enough foods high in mg, try eating more as magnesium is huge in arterial health..

    does your bp fall when you get up? Or just randomly. If it's positional, try researching 'orthostatic hypotension' and maybe you can find some answers in that search. could be you just got up too fast..that can be a common occurrence depending on different variables.

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Nicoleburba Sorry, I just saw your question regarding kvass, yes it's easy. I"ll post it for you in the morning because at the moment I cannot remember the salt ratio..lol it's been a while since I made it. Until then, the vessel I use is always mason jars but when you see the recipe, mine or anyone else here that shares their recipe..will have their vessel of preference but I find that mason jars are very handy for this purpose but use a wide mouth for easier cleaning etc..but you will need the beets of course, and take care to chop them into med size chuncks for if you cut them too small they will ferment too fast. If I get a chance to come back to the puter this eve I'll post it tonight but prolly will be early in the am..

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    @torey @LaurieLovesLearning So it sounds like I'm making two separate teas. Works for me.

    As for the link, I wasn't planning on buying it, I was just referencing it as inspiration. I also noted the questionable ingredients and bad reviews- anyway that brand is overpriced in my opinion, and I'm cheap. I usually just order from Mountain Rose and mix.

    I do have dried apples( we dehydrate heaps of them every fall), so I might have to experiment.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,515 admin

    @blevinandwomba When I made that tea, the hot water sucked the flavor right out of them. I used what I put in there for 2 mugs worth. Those apples were so poached and not very appealing after 2 cups. Haha

    I still threw my cinnamon stick into my cup of yogi tea. I have to get everything out of those! 😊

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    I just now saw your post about making the tea. I missed it when I commented yesterday. Thanks for sharing your experiment.

  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @silvertipgrizz Is this close to what you were remembering for the Kvass?


  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭

    @LaurieLovesLearning where do you get your Hibiscus? I can't seem to find a source for it that doesn't also have licorice root. I have been told not to use licorice because of my heart arrhythmia. But I do so love the flavor.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,515 admin

    @marjstratton I bought it from a local store that carries a few bulk herbs. Fortunately, we have two places that carry it. The other is a health food store that carries some bulk herbs for tea.

    You should buy from an herbalist. I could give you Canadian sources (Richters.com may have some, Hollow Reed Holistic in Manitoba, or Harmonic Arts in BC), but you might be just as well to check here:

    If you still can't find any that work, let us know & we will try to direct you elsewhere.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @LaurieLovesLearning there is a local store in town that sells fresh herbs and fresh vegetables. They are on my list of places to go for some other things as well.

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @RustBeltCowgirl , @Annie Kate

    The link that RustBeltCowgirl posted here is a lot like my recipe. The difference is regarding the salt amount.

    There was a webinar done by someone some time ago and ferments was one of the main topics or the main topic ?? Can't remember now, but one of the mods was a long time ferment-er and he stated that he used: 1 TBS pink Himalayan salt per 1 Quart jar. I also found another site that lists that same ratio. I had not been using that much salt.

    Basically you cut your beets (not skinned if you clean them off good, and either organic or you grew them yourself and know they are pesticide free..otherwise the best thing is to peel them..and the reason you want the skin/peel on the beets and any other..most other vegs, is that there is where a load of nutrients are)..You cut your beets into about 1 inch cubes..not looking for perfection but rather you do not want them to ferment too fast and turn to wine as the beet has a high sugar content. Certainly do not grate them.

    Heat the water that you will ferment your beets with. When the water is very warm add the salt and stir til dissolved for equal distribution/ie brine..

    let that cool to room temp and add your beets. Make sure the brine covers the beets completely and that you leave 1 inch head space in the jar..ie room for the ferment to expand a little..without pouring over the jar..

    I put a coffee filter over the top and secure with a large rubber band so I get a double wrap of the rubber band to ensure any unseen critters/knats or whatever might have snuck in your house, do not get in the jar. I also wrap a towel around the jar to help the ferment stay warm and keep direct sunlight out in case I forget and open the curtain in that room.

    Place in a dark room around 70 plus degrees and check every day. Depending on the warmth of the room you ferment in will determine how long it takes to be ready. So tasting after the first so many days...I think I checked about the 4th day but I smelled it every day as once you ferment enough you will readily recognize what stage your ferments are at thus if they are ready.

    Your water should be either spring water (for the minerals), or distilled..no minerals but also no chlorine or fluoride.

    I got some beets on Tuesday and will ferment them this afternoon. I will take good notes for the whole process and let you know how the TBS per quart of water went. I know there is a remedy if your ferment is still too salty when it is ready..I will have to find that info again. Although I think a few days or so in the fridge after the ferment is complete, pretty sure that is one of the ways to mellow that out of it...you could also put the beet cubes in water for a quick douse and rinse which should neutralize out some of the salt so you could also eat the beets, as well as drink the liquid..

    Don't forget to watch for bubbles as evidence it is alive, ie your ferment is working. And if it does not smell good and clean..ie it smells bad and you see black patches/mold...it is not safe to eat toss it. Having said that, if you see white stuff floating on the top you should be able to gently spoon that off the surface and it should be fine...the white floating stuff that sometimes floats on the top has a name that I cannot remember but I have had it on my ferments and removed it and those ferments were good without any negative effects.

    In case you determine the beet kvass is still a bit too earthy for you as it is a little too much for me but I drink it anyway...ferment some pineapple including the core where most of the anti inflammatory critters reside, and then try mixing a little of that into the beet kvass, and only enough to make it palatable for you..Or just add some canned pineapple juice or other healthy juice.

    You can either eat the beats in a variety of diff recipes, or add them to your compost. Some people save a few beets to help the next batch start to ferment a little faster.

    Keep in mind that using ginger coins, from the ginger hands you get in the produce section..even at walmart..is great fro fermenting. When I started making my own kombucha I learned somewhere along the way that 'ginger would ferment me if I got in the bottle with it' lol..ie it has a great affinity to ferment things it comes in contact with in the fermentation environment..And it is very healthy too..so you could add that to your beet kvass at any time in the learning process and it should flavor up the beets too.

    I'll look for more kvass how to's by others and will try to find the study from the ER in Russia that I found some years back...

    Remember the reason for the salt is to keep the ferment from going bad ie bad microbes could get to the brew and render it unsafe to use.

    Oh, I do not use whey in my ferments...Although I would if I needed to. Many do and like it that way. It's your choice.

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Nicoleburba

    116 systolic is normal for some even as we age. think, 'the blue zone'....albeit a life time of eating big ag foods results in that not being the case as we age..

    some people 90/60 is normal and tolerated without issues...which is why it's critical to know what is normal baseline... imagine responding to a wreck and finding a patient conscious with a bp of 90/60...the first thing one might think would commonly be hypoglycemic shock that the body was still compensating for... Iv'e seen it happen...and then quickly they lost consciousness... all that in the first seconds to minutes of assessing patient status.

    sometimes when someone gets up and gets light headed it can be a good thing.... for example a wanted pregnancy remembering the changes that take place in a woman's body esp in early pregnancy..

    just more food for thought..😊

  • Annie Kate
    Annie Kate Posts: 680 ✭✭✭✭

    Thank you so much, @silvertipgrizz. I have a few homegrown beets that have been in the fridge for a while.... That is going on my maybe to do list (after dealing with the sauerkraut that should be done and trimming the cabbages that I didn't kraut).

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Annie Kate If you fermented your cabbage for sauerkraut... you already know how to make kvass..

    kraut: salt and squeeze the dickens out of the cabbage...ferment lol

    Kvass: salt, water, beets...ferment...yeah!!!

  • Annie Kate
    Annie Kate Posts: 680 ✭✭✭✭

    Well, that sounds easier than I thought! :) Thank you for the encouragement @silvertipgrizz

  • DurwardPless
    DurwardPless Posts: 162 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2020

    @torey Thank you for your advice. I eat oatmeal daily with a teaspoon of cinnamon. I believe it is my favorite spice. Sunflower seeds, bran, and yogurt are daily treats as well. I will know how well all are working in a couple of months.

  • DurwardPless
    DurwardPless Posts: 162 ✭✭✭
    edited December 2020

    @silvertipgrizz Wow, Thank you for all the information. I have been worried about cutting salt out as much as I have. You have given me much to think about, research, and change Thanks.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @marjstratton Do you have a Latin market near you? They usually have hibiscus, among other herbs you wouldn't expect to see. My hibiscus plants are getting ready to bloom for the second time.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @Tave do you mean hibiscus blooms? Yes, apparently there are three Latin markets in Eugene near where I live.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Yes, in Mexico and South America, they use the blooms to make drinks. They're usually dried, but sometimes you can find them fresh. I saved the seeds from the fresh ones, soaked them for two days, planted them, and now have three bushes. They typically bloom as the days start getting shorter, so now is a good time to plant them if you're in the northern hemisphere. The leaves are edible, too. I throw a couple of them in a salad.