Evergreen Cake

Torey
Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

Just got a new email from Rosalee and this recipe was part of it. Thought I'd share it for anyone who doesn't get her emails.

I was one of the recipe testers for Wild Remedies and this recipe was one that I got to do, but it didn't make it into the book. I thought it was a shame cause I really liked it. But now here it is. I thought it was particularly good with a cream cheese icing with needles added to it. It says you can use any tasty needles but I used the Douglas Fir stated in the recipe.

https://delaforet.s3-us-west-2.amazonaws.com/RMC-Douglas-Fir-and-Olive-Oil-Cake.pdf

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Comments

  • Hassena
    Hassena Posts: 345 ✭✭✭

    Thanks for sharing this! I've been wanting to do more with evergreens. :)

  • Wendy
    Wendy Posts: 138 ✭✭✭

    I have a recipe for Evergreen cookies I haven't tried yet. Maybe this week I will.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @Wendy Could you share your cookie recipe, please?

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,519 admin
    edited December 2020

    All I have are spruce needles (both blue & green...so white spruce 🤪) or pine (scots) if we go for a drive. I am not sure if these would work taste wise. Would you have any idea?

    Along with this subject, it is wise to put a caution about safe & poisonous, having your ID correct.

    "White pine is widely considered the best tasting pine tree. But most other pines (Slippery Elm, Black Birch, Yellow Birch, Red Spruce, Black Spruce, Balsam Fir, Tamarack, etc.) also have edible barks.

    Watch out for the inedible pine trees. Norfolk Island Pine (Araucaria heterophylla), the Yew (Taxus) and Ponderosa Pines (Pinus ponderosa — aka Western Yellow Pine, Blackjack Pine, or Bull Pine)."

    -exerpt from https://www.skilledsurvival.com/eating-pine-how-to-eat-a-pine-tree/

    Here is a more detailed description for identification purposes:


  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    I should have put cautions in about choosing edible conifers. Thanks for pointing that out @LaurieLovesLearning. I would think that the spruce you have in your area should work.

    This is a link to an article about edible conifers. https://www.growforagecookferment.com/foraging-for-pine-needles/

    And another with lots of suggestions and recipes for using conifer needles and which ones to choose. https://gathervictoria.com/2015/11/08/recipes-for-comfort-joy-the-healing-powers-of-conifers/

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @torey I’ve just made this cake and turned out pretty good. Douglas Fir trees are few and far between down here and I wasn’t travelling anywhere in this rain. I did have some Douglas Fir EO though and added 3 drops. Got to say any more would have been overpowering. So an interesting flavour, mixing lemon, Douglas Fir and honey. As far as a healthy cake recipe and possible allergies, this is a keeper. I used whole meal plain flour, next time I’m going to do a GF version, mixing tapioca, coconut and almond flour. Warm with ice cream would be nice or a lemon syrup to pour over when cooked, would work too.

  • water2world
    water2world Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭

    @torey I saved that recipe from Rosalee, cause it sounded very good. I'll have to definitely try it now! Congrats on being one of the testers. I have enjoyed that book---lots of info!

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @Annie Kate I'm sure if you made it, it would get devoured right away. Its so good that maybe it is a way to convince them that there might be something to this wildcrafting/foraging/alternatives and that you aren't weird after all.

    @monica197 Rosemary sounds like a good ingredient to add. It would go nicely with the citrus flavours of the lemon and fir. Let us know how it goes.

  • karenjanicki
    karenjanicki Posts: 968 ✭✭✭✭

    Sounds intriguing! Thanks for sharing :)

  • soeasytocraft
    soeasytocraft Posts: 237 ✭✭✭

    @jodienancarrow Sounds very intriguing! I'm considering using a combo of Banksina pine and spruce needles in some sort of gluten free version. What proportions did you try in your tapioca, coconut and almond flour version? Too bad nothing works like good old bad for me gluten! 😂

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @soeasytocraft the recipe called for 1 3/4 cups of all purpose flour. I did 1 cup of tapioca, 1/2 cup almond meal and 1/4 cup of coconut flour. I really like using tapioca flour in my cake recipes but like to mix it up with others, besan flour is also very good. Coconut flour really soaks up the moisture, so you need to add more moisture if using it in your mixes. I usually add another egg when using coconut flour.

  • soeasytocraft
    soeasytocraft Posts: 237 ✭✭✭

    @jodienancarrow Thanks for the flour conversion. Hopefully Ill get to out to pick tomorrow and give it a whirl.

  • soeasytocraft
    soeasytocraft Posts: 237 ✭✭✭

    Finally Im ready to make this cake today. Got the needles ready to go. My question for those who have made the cake is how much did you use in the recipe? Is the measurement for whole pine needles (hard to measure whole) or for once they are chopped or ground up?

    We've had unseasonably warm weather! Its been awesome for picking needles but also keeping me outside burning brush and doing lots of clean up that is unheard of in January! But I think we need cake for more energy. 😃

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @soeasytocraft This is part of my notes for the recipe.

    ¼ cup Doug Fir Needles yielded 3/16 cup ground needles

    I think the ¼ cup of needles was enough for my taste.

    The needles did not pulverize in the food processor; just kind of spun around with the blades. A blender worked much better for me. 

  • soeasytocraft
    soeasytocraft Posts: 237 ✭✭✭

    @torey Thanks. I tried several different types of processors and none worked well with fresh needles. The ones that were somewhat chopped I spread out on a towel in the dark warm laundry/furnace room for 2 nights. After a bit of drying they ground up nicely. I'm thinking ¼ cup ground would be plenty of flavour for men taste as well. I'll get this cake baked yet! 😁

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @soeasytocraft The longer needles of the pine probably wrap around the blades more easily than the fir needles. I can see how they would plug up a machine. I look forward to hearing how it tastes with pine.