500 edibles in a forest garden

Comments

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭

    I love things like this and can not wait to start one myself. Check out this YouTube channel as they travel around showing different peoples food forests all over the country and world! https://www.youtube.com/c/PeteKanarisGreenDreamsFL/videos

  • ltwickey
    ltwickey Posts: 369 ✭✭✭

    Great article. Reminds me that the best asparagus and strawberries I ever had, were the ones I stumbled across growing wild in the Black Hills of SD!

    If we treat it right, the earth will provide!!

  • annbeck62
    annbeck62 Posts: 1,024 ✭✭✭✭

    Love the idea of this.

  • NarjissMomOf3
    NarjissMomOf3 Posts: 113 ✭✭✭

    Thank you Cornelius. Will check it out.


    Permaculture is really fascinating. I myself am still learning to understand the concepts.

    Wish everyone succes with making their dreams come true!

  • DurwardPless
    DurwardPless Posts: 162 ✭✭✭

    Here is another link that will open your eyes to bushes So you want a food forest? Bushes - My top 6 - YouTube

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2021

    I bought fruit trees and fruit bushes this spring and plan to set up guilds for the new arrivals.

    Many people do not know this, and I was one, apple trees do not like grass! They do much better with herbs and pollinators planted beneath them.

    I'll be setting up guilds for each tree variety and linking them when I can. Permaculture principles really help your property and backyard come alive and be easier to manage, plus they are fun to plan.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2021

    @DurwardPless I have wild currents I need to move from the open field they are in. I need that field for hay and later goats. The goats would mow them to the ground, lol. Plus its a walk and my fruits Iike to have near by. Great link. Thank you

  • water2world
    water2world Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭

    @NarjissMomOf3 and DurwardPless great links! Thanks for posting.

  • water2world
    water2world Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭

    @Cornelius Wow, your link has a lot of videos That I found interest in! Thanks for posting.

  • water2world
    water2world Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭

    @Denise Grant I, for another one, was not aware that apple trees did not like grass! Interesting fact! Sounds like you have a PLAN!

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @water2world I did not know that until I took permaculture classes. Guilds make sense when you stufdy them plus it takes advantages of space and makes less work. The trees are much healthier with beneficial plants surrounding them.

  • water2world
    water2world Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭

    @Denise Grant I'm definitely going to look into that. Anything for less work and space advantage. LOL But seriously, if the trees are healthier with beneficial plants around them, I'm for that!!

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2021

    I good article for creating a food forest. I am getting mine started here and saving out plants for down in Ga. Its going to be a totally new gardening and growing experience there

    https://www.homestead.org/gardening/tips-from-an-established-forest-garden/

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I just watched this video. It was fascinating how the Maya sustainably farmed in the forest. We can learn so much from ancient farmers.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm very interested in permaculture, but it seems to be quite difficult to get it started. It's probably easier in hot rain forest climates, which seems to be where they best thrive.

    It's certainly possible to have a productive permaculture garden in Northeastern North America, because people have done it. Check out the book, "Paradise Lot: Two Plant Geeks, One-Tenth of an Acre, and the Making of an Edible Garden Oasis in the City" by Eric Toensmeier and Jonathan Bates to see what was done in Massachusetts.

    But a food forest is a whole different order of work and planning from plowing up the ground and sowing an annual garden, so you have to think of it as a long-term investment of time and money. I certainly wouldn't recommend it if you move as often as most Americans do, every few years.

  • MaryRowe
    MaryRowe Posts: 736 ✭✭✭✭

    A couple of interesting articles have come up in the last few days about Native Peoples creating food forests in what is now British Columbia. This is one of them:

    The other article in Popular Science was longer, but it was in the newsfeed on my IPad, and I can't figure out how to link it. Both articles emphasize the ways these food forests helped create biodiversity and animal habitat, and how they have survived, long after their creators were forced to leave.

  • karenjanicki
    karenjanicki Posts: 968 ✭✭✭✭

    That's fascinating!

  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2021

    Would love to be able to get to that point. Actually I think I have seen something similar. I think Michael Pilarski and Friends of the Trees is doing something similar. https://friendsofthetrees.net/about-friends-trees/about-friends-of-the-trees

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @MaryRowe I have been fortunate enough to attend classes with Dr. Nancy Turner (one of North America's foremost Ethnobotantists), Leigh Joseph (Ethnobotanist from Skwxwú7mesh First Nation), Beth Bedard (Professor of Archaeology, TRU) and several elders from various First Nations. When I was at classes in the Nass Valley (not too far from the Ts’msyen village, Psacely, mentioned in the article) with members of the Nisga'a First Nation, we learned quite a bit about indigenous agriculture. We went harvesting for rice root in the estuary which, after harvesting the little bulblets, the main part of the bulb (the grandfather bulb) was replanted. When we were harvesting soapberries, one of the other students asked an elder why she was picking whole branches off some of the plants instead of just picking berries. The answer was "I am pruning". So berry bushes were cared for, not just harvested. Some nations have assigned specific berry patches to individual families as part of their responsibility. They have to care for the bushes and ensure survival as well as harvesting that patch. I have also learned that the basket grass which grows at most historic village sites in my area, is not native here but was brought in through trade and then encouraged to grow in village sites.

    So lots of forest agriculture going on here.

  • MaryRowe
    MaryRowe Posts: 736 ✭✭✭✭

    @torey That is so interesting! When I did my graduate work at University of Washington in Seattle in the 1980's, one of my doctoral fields was with ethnobotanist Eugene Hunn. He worked with elders of several tribes in eastern Washington state, mainly on the Yakama reservation. Traditional diets there were more than 60% plants, as much as 80% sometimes. Villages typically had territories that included several environmental and resource zones from fishing sites on rivers to dryland meadows for root and plant gathering to mountain sides for berry-picking and hunting. The village moved from site to site over the course of the year to harvest the resources in season. There too stewardship was strong in the culture, and each family was responsible for the care of the patches at each resource site they used. Women gathering camas root, for example, routinely pulled out any of the poisonous "death camas" or other harmful plants they encountered in their patch, and only harvested plants of a certain size and space apart, to encourage the growth of the plants they left.

    It sounds like the forest agriculture of the coastal tribes was more extensive and complex than what people were doing inland on the Columbia Plateau, but indeed, in both areas there was lots of agriculture going on. It didn't look like Western agriculture, so European didn't recognize it when they saw it. Only now permaculturists are beginning to rediscover what indigenous people have always known, and then only the barest outlines of it--that there can be agriculture that works with Nature instead of against it, and it can enhance the environment, benefiting people, the land, and the other species we share it with.