Seeds are coming back into stock

VermontCathy
VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

I ordered most of my 2021 seed supply late last year, playing it safe in case of seed shortages. However, some of the seed varieties I wanted were not available.

In the past week, I've checked my usual online seed sources, and most of the missing varieties are available again! Either they found new sources, or they needed more time to process the 2020 seed crop.

Lincoln peas, Lunar White and Cosmic Purple carrots, Strawberry Husk ground cherries, and Sub-Arctic tomatoes were all in this category. About the only thing I still can't find is the Fortex beans, but I have plenty of other bean varieties to cover my need for beans.

If there are any seeds you couldn't find last year be sure to check again before January ends and there is a good chance you will find them available again. But don't want too long, because we may see the seed suppliers run out again before spring.

Tagged:

Comments

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,542 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @VermontCathy Strawberry Husk Ground cherries? Oh no. That sounds too interesting.

    I love different colored carrots and have the Cosmic purple. I use colored carrots to get children interested in growing food. Anything rainbow colored and the more color the better.

    There was one very colorful lettuce that was out of stock last fall. I suppose I could ask for a bank loan and go take a look at that seed company again.

    They say birds of a feather flock together. Its the same for seeds. I actually think it's illegal to buy just one seed packet.

  • Jens the Beekeeper
    Jens the Beekeeper Posts: 651 admin

    My preferred seed company has put orders from people without a existing customer number on hold to get done with the current order volume.

    I too have played it safe and bought it last year but as @VermontCathy I couldn't get all I wanted especially some flowers. It is coming back in Stock but not yet my choices.

  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Retail stores are stocked for the season already. The one store that I was in had 4 carousels of seeds.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I did a lot of seed saving last year, so I didn't need a lot of seeds this year. I may be able to raid my sister's stash for the rest of what I want:)

  • herbantherapy
    herbantherapy Posts: 453 ✭✭✭✭

    I got all my seeds for the year! Now if only canning lids would come available!!

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I don't typically see canning jars or lids in stores here until the summer canning season starts. I don't know what the situation is online, or in stores in other parts of the country.

    It's also good to stock up on vinegar, salt, pectin, and any other canning needs. I'm hoping 2021 will be another great year for tomatoes and pickles, and a much better year for carrots. And perhaps some apples, after getting almost none last year.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Denise Grant "Strawberry Husk Ground cherries? Oh no. That sounds too interesting."

    That's the variety I grew last year. They are incredibly sweet. I expected something like the bitter gooseberries from the grocery store, and was very pleasantly surprised.

    I tried Aunt Molly's too, but they didn't come up. I probably did something wrong, or perhaps they don't like my climate. I saved some of the seeds from my Strawberry Husk last year, but supplemented with a couple of new packets too.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,542 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @herbantherapy The amish community around here can still order canning lids wholesale. I can get a sleeve 100 flat lids for $10. Possible a group like that if you have one in your area would be able to help

    @VermontCathy The top supplier made an announcement a few months back that due to backlog canning supplies would not be out until March. I imaging they will be higher priced and sell out as soon as they are put out.

    Years ago we did not have ther luxury of going to a store and buying canning supplies. What did they use? I know some items had wax poured on top top seal (jams and jellies) and I have heard of a reusable flat sealiong top but I am not sure of the name. I can check on that. A friend of mine has had hers for over twenty years and they still work fine

  • Jens the Beekeeper
    Jens the Beekeeper Posts: 651 admin

    @Tave seed saving is on the list once again for this year as I bought only open pollinating varieties 😁 especially peas and beans as well as salads are the plan.

    I will participate in a collaboration to save a rare yellow tomato through seed saving and am waiting to get the seeds to start the plants.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Jens Nice! Saving rare species is a rewarding project. I think I would still be too nervous about it dying on me, especially tomatoes.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    For the reusable canning lids... This is where I bought mine. Very quick, for current standards. Free shipping and good quality. I have used them a few times now and very happy.

    https://canninglids.com/

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @vickeym Have you had any failures with those reusable lids and gaskets? I've always been nervous about experimenting for fear of losing a big chunk of my canned goods.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    VermontCathy So far I have only had 1 failure and I used a lot of them. Some I have even used more than once. My biggest issue at this point is sharing my goodies with someone and they don't return my lids. I have had that a few times so far. They won't be getting any more goodies from me. :(

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @vickeym Thank you, good to know. I should get some even if I only keep them around as backup when I can't get the regular disposable ones.

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    What kind of lids are you ladies looking for...specifically? I ask because I'm looking for better lids than the plastic ones not just for function but also for asthetics. Fore example, a few days ago I watched a vid of a lady showing lids she saved from a candle store for odds and ends rather than canning and I thought they were pretty but some of her lids she had some problems with rusting just becaues of how she was using them, but also she was storing a salt/seasoning mix in one of them and the salt had starting eroding the lid..zinc or metal I can't remember.

    Also as mentioned some time ago I think it was late summer when many of us were looking for canning jars and lids someone mentioned a new 'Ball' or "Mason" facgory was being built....I called Ball regarding a jar question and asked them if they were building a new factory and I"m pretty sure she said it was in Ohio and I think it was just getting ready to open..that was about 2 months ago...just in case anyone was interested in that tidbit..

    Pleaes forgive my run on sentences as it hurts my hands if I type very long..

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    For those who might be familiar with Jackie Clay, a writer for Backwoods Home magazine and author of several books including cookbooks, She is the reason I decided to order these lids from Harvest Guard. She uses them and highly recommends them.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @vickeym "My biggest issue at this point is sharing my goodies with someone and they don't return my lids. I have had that a few times so far. They won't be getting any more goodies from me. :("

    When I give gifts of jams, jellies, etc. I assume that I won't be getting the jar back, much less the lid or screw ring. When I give home-baked cookies, I don't expect to get the container back.

    In many cases, that person will give back a completed unrelated gift. For example, I've received fresh eggs from friends who raise chickens.

    The cost of a jar or lid isn't much. I consider it part of the goodwill gift.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    VermontCathy Normally I agree. However, I am now using the reusable lids which the initial cost is higher, and with lids and rings as well as jars getting much harder to find. Here in Alaska we haven't been able to buy jars in almost a year. We have just started seeing small quantities show up in a few stores and they sell out almost before they are on the shelves.

    Many of my friends and family also are not much into making stuff or growing stuff so there is not usually any type of trade off or sharing with me. Only me to them.

    This is why I now require them to return my lids and jars. If they don't return several times in a row, I will quit providing items in my jars and do freezer jams and short term storage types for them.

  • flowerpower *
    flowerpower * Posts: 258 ✭✭✭

    @VermontCathy The rubber canning lids are reusable if lid has been gently lifted by slipping a spoon tip gradually under it. They should not be reused for high risk foods (like acid foods, meat and fish) probably. When you can you can tell right away if a jar is sealing so the unsealed jar can be placed in a fridge and consumed or reprocessed with another batch. I was giving canned goods to a male friend and he was treating them like trash glass and even after I trained him on that he was throwing out the rings and lids. A bit more training got him to remember more often to retain the items. I think placing an instruction label on the jars would help: "Please save the jar and tops for me. Open the lid gently with a spoon tip". Buying the items a few times builds cost awareness too!

    Guess I should say something about seeds. 🙃 I am musing with the idea that we should plant for 100, and supply seeds for a 1000 to make sure everyone gets growing and has food. I am also starting a few plants inside hoping to get seeds from them indoors. We will see how that works out.

  • nicksamanda11
    nicksamanda11 Posts: 755 ✭✭✭✭

    It's so interesting to hear about seed shortages. Even when there was supposed to be last year I just walked in my tractor supply in mount juliet tn and the shelves were completely stocked with seeds. Not my first choice- but PLENTY of seeds none the less. And bakers creek had seeds all year too.

  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭

    I bought some seed last year, but I have basically waiting to see if one of our local growers will have seed soon at the Co-Op.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @flowerpower * I reuse canning lids in situations where I am not acid bath canning. (I don't do pressure canning.) For example, I make my own kimchi by fermenting in half-gallon canning jars, and put regular canning lids and screw rings on top. Once the fermentation takes place for 2 days, I move the jars to the refrigerator and it the kimchi within a few weeks. It would be silly and wasteful not to reuse the lids in this situation.

    But when I actually acid bath can, I always throw the Ball-style lids out after one use. Perhaps I'm overly cautious, but the lids are not very expensive and I would not want to lose more of my valuable canned goods through a lid failure. Most everything that I truly "can" (i.e., seal) is in the "must be acid to be safe from botulism" category. That includes tomatoes or tomato sauce, dilly beans, jams and jellies, and so forth.

    I have not tried to remove lids from canned goods with a spoon, but I think it would be a frustrating experience. My lids seal very well, so I use a can-opener to very gently but firmly lift the lid the first time. The can-opener has a nice little lip that makes it easy to get a grip on the lid.

    However, I am very interested in the reusable canning lids that @vickeym pointed out, and I may give them a try.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @vickeym I'm sad to hear that your friends and family don't do anything for you in return for your gifts to them. While we shouldn't expect a direct exchange of an A for a B unless we're doing formal barter, we certainly should expect the members of our local communities to help each other, and the benefits not always be one-way.

    My next-door neighbors are new to the area, having moving in from another state within the last year or two. I didn't meet the family immediately after their move, but later when the husband offered to chainsaw some downed trees on our property into firewood for us. We accepted the offer and gave them half the wood in return.

    Later, I gave them some home-baked Christmas cookies as a gift. They responded with a gift of fresh eggs from their chickens. Once winter passes, I expect we'll be seeing much more of each other. Right now everyone is hunkered down, and not just because of COVID-19.

    It must be frustrating when you have trouble findings things like jars and lids on your local shelves. Alaska is always going to be the end of a long supply chain for stuff that must come from Outside instead of being made locally, but COVID-19 has probably made things even worse. And I'm sure everything up there is more expensive than in the Lower 48. It's sometimes more difficult to find things on a store shelf in Vermont than in more urban areas, but it's not Alaska-difficult. If I visit enough stores, I can usually find things like canning jars and lids in canning season.

    The past year has taught me to keep more non-perishable stuff in stock all the time because I no longer believe I can buy canning jars, canning lids, garden tools, grow lights, or even wood (for raised beds) on short notice. When I went to rebuild a rotted-out raised bed last spring, I was stunned to find that the local lumberyard was completely closed for at least a month, and wood was completely unavailable with no option for socially-distanced purchase. I had no choice but to wait. If I had been planning to create garden beds for the very first time rather than just making do with the old ones for an additional month, that would have been a bad situation.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    VermontCathy Yes, we are definitely at the end of the supply chain here. But that is also part of the good thing about living here. Because of the possible breaks or slow downs in the supply chain as well as just the general issues hat can come up here, such as earthquakes, avalanches that can close roads, accidents, fires, etc. We tend to keep a supply of goods on hand.

    I do have a few good friends that we regularly trade things and share things with each other. My best friend here lives a few miles down the road, I never know what to expect from her. She regularly surprises my husband and I with goodies of one kind or another, as well as sending scraps home to our critters. Our dog is in love with her. She goes crazy when she realizes we are going there.

    She just left this morning to go visit family in the lower 48. I'll miss her. We chat a lot. Will be gone for about a month.

    Time for me to head to bed. Have a wonderful weekend.

  • flowerpower *
    flowerpower * Posts: 258 ✭✭✭

    @VermountCathy Opening a jar lid with a spoon is easy especially after some practice. I must admit I have been doing this all my life since my mother trained her kids to do it. Take ring off of jar, if there is one. Inspect the jar for seal: see the seal; feel the seal; and later hear the seal. Hold spoon in hand with thin edge of scoop up against the jar and the lid gently wedging between a jar thread and the lid. Wiggle the spoon until you head a hiss and pop when the jar unseals.