Is your backyard a medicine cabinet

Monek Marie
Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited March 2021 in Growing Medicinals

Is your backyard a medicine cabinet and if not what could you do to create one? With the times we are living in I think we all need to have as much on hand or know where to find it.

My backyard and property is one but this year I need top analyze it well, note what I have and see what I need. I also know I have more than I think - I have not used trees and bark as much but plan to in the future

If you live in a small space or rent you can still get a few medicinal plants, forage in areas near you or create a group where you share.

I found boneset on my property a few years back. I was looking for native plants to dry for arrangements so when i found this I had to identify it. I was thrilled when I found out all its uses.

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Comments

  • seeker.nancy - Central Texas
    seeker.nancy - Central Texas Posts: 795 ✭✭✭✭

    It is definitely something to work on. I'm trying to add in healing herbs each year, as many types as I can grow. Health is a big limiting factor for me but we just do the best we can with what we have. Even if it's just an herb or two in a window sill or under a stronger light source it's a start. There is almost always something a person can grow wherever they live.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2021

    @torey

    What herbs would be best to add for a backyard medicine cabinet or better yet to find on your property or backyard if you're starting out?

    When I lived in Rochester Ny I would go by a lot of abandoned houses or businesses shut down and see a lot of great plants - weeds to the neighborhood.

  • karenjanicki
    karenjanicki Posts: 961 ✭✭✭✭

    We have a small piece of leased land but we're tremendously blessed with an abundance of wild edibles and medicinals. We have plantain, dandelions, violet, cleavers, self heal, chickweed, daylillies and horsetail which I use to scrub pots and pans :).

  • frogvalley
    frogvalley Posts: 675 ✭✭✭✭

    Anybody use trillium? We bought a house on a cove and there is a very interesting species growing in several areas. It's huge! Like "grown near a power plant" huge. I think it's the Trillium grandiflorum, Great White Trillium. Anybody eat it or use it medicinally?

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2021

    @torey I am lucky to have everything you mentioned but the elder, which I am fixing this year. My one brother has elder and lives close by so until mine produces I at least have a supply.

    I must love taking a walk and looking at all the plants. Nature has blessed us.

    I need to study and use using twigs, bark and trees more

    Thank you for your list

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,632 admin

    @frogvalley We had Trilliums when I was growing up in south coastal BC. It is the Western or Pacific Trillium with a white flower (T. ovatum). T. grandiflorum is the provincial flower of Ontario but there are 4 other species that grow in Ontario as well. So Great White Trillium can't be picked in Ontario.

    I have never used Trillium but from what I understand the leaves are good in a salad. My mum would never let me pick it as she said it should be left for when we really need it and it wasn't all that common. I have never needed it.

    Trillium is probably best known medicinally as Birthroot or Bethroot. Used to facilitate childbirth. I believe it is Red Trillium (T. erectum) that is most widely used for this purpose although I understand that other Trilliums can be used as well. I have never had a pregnancy or childbirth in my care, so that is one area of herbal medicine that I prefer to leave to the midwives.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jodienancarrow Those garden areas sounds amazing! Just love the way you put it together.

  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @torey 😁 It's not so much having the distilling equipment; it's what you admit to distilling in it. Mom needs distilled water for her CPAP.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,632 admin

    @RustBeltCowgirl Its not illegal in Canada to own the equipment but as you say, What you admit to doing with it. I hadn't thought of distilled water as the excuse but it is a very good one.

  • Megan Venturella
    Megan Venturella Posts: 678 ✭✭✭✭

    Just today I took a walk to find out what’s growing around me. It was so exciting! I already knew we had dock, dandelion, plantain, and elder- but today I found rose, speedwell, violet, pine, cedar, and an ocean of chickweed.

    I started using an app called seek by inaturalist to identify weeds in the area. Then I do a search under the scientific name to see if there are medicinal uses since the county extension has info on how to kill weeds, not turn them into tea. 😊

    Ill plant an herb garden too, but it’s going to be a while.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2021

    @frogvalley Trillium is considered endangered here so I tend to admire it and not use it. I will dig it up carefully and move it if its in a dangerous place I know it will get destroyed.

    TH cool think about Trillium is I use it to know when Morrells are up. They both come up at the same time here. And they pretty much grow in the same area.

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 2021

    I am trying to add more medicinals to my yard as well food crops. I currently have a few different mints and want to try and focus on perennials. Do you have any recommendations?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,632 admin

    @Cornelius All of the ones I have listed above are perennials except for chickweed depending on where you live and the berry bushes that are biennial. They are all great starter plants with the benefit of being multi-purpose.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Cornelius, I forgot what your growing zone is. Culantro is a good perennial that tastes like cilantro, but I think it would freeze. I plan on growing mine in a pot that I can bring in when the temperature gets too cold. It goes well with pigeon peas, another perennial that likes heat.

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Last year I started to study and try growing medicinal herbs and I am continuing that this year in additional to trying different fruits and vegetables.

    Last year I was able to grow Marshmallow, Stingy Nettles, Mullein and Evening Primrose all of which survived the winter and are coming back.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am lucky they all grow naturally here @Lisa K Love them all and am just starting to use them more.

    The Mullein can be used as a torch after ther flowers dry and when its green you can cut it and dip it in wax for a natural candle

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Denise Grant you are lucky to have them growing naturally, here it is mostly generic landscaping plants before that it was a landing strip. And thanks for the info on Mullein!

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Lisa K I just love Mullein. I introduced my niece to it last year and it now a favorite plant of hers.

    You have a nice start to medicinal herbs!~

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Denise Grant Thanks, looking forward to trying some new ones this year!

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I started a little medicinal garden last spring. I had borage, valerian, lemon balm, echinacea, chamomile, yarrow, anise hyssop and I want to say another but I can't recall and unfortunately it's not coming back up.

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭

    @torey and @Tave Thank you! I will look into these!

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I remembered the other one that I had planted last year for the first time in my new medicinal garden, lovage.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JennyT I love lovage

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,632 admin
    edited March 2021

    @JennyT In addition to culinary & medicinal uses for lovage, it makes a great trap crop for black aphids. The first time I noticed, all of a sudden all the seed heads were black. On closer inspection they were covered with black aphids. So just clip the seed heads off into a paper bag and then burn it. No aphids on anything else!

    Be prepared for it to get quite large. Mine gets to be over 7 feet tall with quite a good circumference. And it self seeds so you will get lots of babies.

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,915 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am going to try to grow my own American ginseng and Moringa.

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Good to know thanks, @torey.

    @Lisa K I want to grow Moringa and American ginseng too. I'm hoping to be able to this year but we'll have to see with us moving.😊

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