Removing tree roots without round up or even salt

Beatrix Jefferies
Beatrix Jefferies Posts: 2 ✭✭✭

We are soon removing three Chinese’s elm growing from my neighbors garden into ours. Finally my neighbor gave us permission. I don’t want to use any round up or poisonous material to kill the roots, due to our and our pets health, Is anyone here familiar with methods, solutions etc... to sagely ‚ kill‘ or remove the roots?

thanks so much, Beatrix Gee

Comments

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @Beatrix Jefferies in a past life, I used Roundup painted straight on cut roots etc, full strength with a paint brush, so small amount. I don’t use that chemical any more. I have just got onto an organic non selective weed killer that might just do the same job but I can’t confirm. It’s called Slasher. Whether its called the same in the States, I do not know. I’ll try to put up a pic, maybe you can contact the company.


  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    @Beatrix Jefferies Welcome to TGN's forum.

    Have you checked out "Our Front Porch Welcome" at: https://community.thegrownetwork.com/categories/our-front-porch-welcome%21-%28please-read-before-posting%2.

    Or the Introductions section at: https://community.thegrownetwork.com/categories/introductions.

    To answer your question, following is a link to a method using Epsom salts. Not sure from the title of the discussion if you are opposed to using this kind of salt as well but Epsom salts isn't going to damage any surrounding plants. I have never done this so can't offer any personal experience. https://deepgreenpermaculture.com/2017/06/11/how-to-kill-a-tree-stump-without-poisonous-chemicals/

  • frogvalley
    frogvalley Posts: 675 ✭✭✭✭

    Thank you for the link @torey as I had never heard of this, but have several trees to deal with.

  • Annie Kate
    Annie Kate Posts: 680 ✭✭✭✭

    My husband rents a stump grinder from Home Depot, but that is very hard work.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,505 admin

    @torey What an interesting approach to rid ones place of stumps.

  • Beatrix Jefferies
    Beatrix Jefferies Posts: 2 ✭✭✭

    Thank you for all your comments. @torrey. I’ve heard about Epsom– or rock salt. However , I have a dog that loves to roam around the garden and I’ve eben reading that the Salt is poisonous for pets. I was thinking of building a protection around the space. Also, since you’ve removed trees with Salt. I also read that Salt stays quite long in the soil. Does it spread a lot, how is planting organic plants, vegetables near the salt area? Thanks so much, Beatrix

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    @Beatrix Jefferies Epsom Salts are not rock salt. Epsom Salts are Magnesium Sulphate. I haven't seen any info that Epsom Salts are poisonous for dogs. They might get a bit of diarrhea from the laxative effects but it shouldn't harm them. Epsom Salts are not bad for the soil. Some gardening websites actually recommend Epsom Salts for some plants. Many soils have become depleted in magnesium so it will replace some which has been lost.

    Rock salt (aka Halite or Himalayan Rock Salt) is just the crystalized form of Sodium Chloride. Sodium chloride will kill your plants. Most dogs are not going to lick at salt enough to do any damage. Poisonings from salt tend to occur when road salt or ice-melt is ingested by dogs who are licking their paws after being exposed or when they drink from a puddle that has been contaminated by road salt. Not all ice melting products are sodium chloride. Some are calcium chloride (this is the type of road salt used in my area).

    If you are really concerned about animals getting at the Epsom Salts then you could put a cover of chicken wire over top of the stump. The article does recommend that the stump be covered with plastic during the process, to keep out water.

  • Jens the Beekeeper
    Jens the Beekeeper Posts: 651 admin

    As @Annie Kate I would suggest a root grinder. Or you can burn the stumps. Drill a big hole in the stump and start a fire in it. It will burn quite deep and the remaining roots will decompose and fed the soil live.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am almost done burning out a large stump. Tomorrow I will go take a look and see how much is left but If it not good enough this time I think one more burn will do it.

    I got to enjoy watching the flames dance this evening and it was very relaxing.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    A caution here on burning stumps. Stumps can smoulder underground for a very long time. The fire can travel along roots and erupt many feet away from the original fire.

    My VFD attended a fire this week that was an old logging brush pile that had been set on fire last fall. It was thought to be extinguished but it held in heavy roots in the ground all winter and erupted in a strong wind.

    So please be very cautious! If you think your fire is out, stick your hand in there and see how much heat is left. We call it cold trailing when following the path of a fire along roots. You make sure that the trail of roots in the ground is cold. A thermal imaging camera is one of our best tools for these types of fires.

  • Annie Kate
    Annie Kate Posts: 680 ✭✭✭✭

    My husband used fire that way once @Jens and I kept on remembering something I'd read about fires smoldering in the roots for weeks and then popping up when it got dry. That didn't happen to us, but if you live in a dry area that may be something to keep in mind @Beatrix Jefferies .

  • Jens the Beekeeper
    Jens the Beekeeper Posts: 651 admin

    @Annie Kate @torey I completely agree with the smoldering and traveling of fire in and through the roots.

    I should have mentioned that it's not a good idea for dry areas. As I live in an area we're this is not a problem in normal years it was never a problem for me.