Hawthorn flowers & leaves & course offered

LaurieLovesLearning
LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,519 admin
edited May 2021 in Wild Edibles & Medicinals

Rosalee has a video available that covers the medicinal use of hawthorn flowers and leaves. A course is offered as well on this same page.

https://www.herbalremediesadvice.org/benefits-of-hawthorn-flowers.html

My question is, can these be dried/tinctured/preserved on some way and still retain their medicinal qualities for later? Is this enough to be able to bypass the wormy berries so common in my area?

Comments

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 2021

    @LaurieLovesLearning There has to be a way to control the problem you have. I will research more.

    But here are a few other problem Hawthorns have:

    I am not sure which way would be good for you to try and save hawthorns. They have such wonderful qualities and uses that is would be great if you could control this. If all else fails I will send you some.

    We have a lot of hawthorn here and I don't think the issue is as bad here. Many years ago hawthorn were brought in to use as a natural fencing. And they liked this area so much they became a problem. I don't have any on this side of the road but my neighbor does and I asked to dig some smaller trees up. He thinks I am crazy!

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    Some of the hawthorns in my area have a rust disease; possibly Quince Rust but more than likely it is Juniper-Hawthorn Rust. The latter requires the two species for the fungus to complete its life cycle. It starts on the juniper and then the spores spread to the hawthorn before going back to the juniper. The saskatoons have it as well and I understand it can spread to other Rosaceae fruit such as apple and pears. Fortunately, it hasn't discovered my cherries or apples. But it doesn't affect them all, so I can find bushes that don't have it. Especially in areas where juniper is a bit less common. Do you know the species of worm or fly that is causing the infestation, @LaurieLovesLearning?

    I have both red ones and black ones. There seems to be some debate in the scientific community as to whether they are individual species or just colour variations of the same species. Personally, I think they are different species but I don't have much to back that up. I will send you some dried berries this fall, @LaurieLovesLearningif it is a good year and I can beat the bears to the bushes. 😁

    I found what I hope to be a prolific grove of hawthorns when on a walk earlier this spring. And another very old tree on the very old ranch where I buy my very old composted dirt. I think it is going to have amazing medicine. All that fertilizer!

    The hawthorns have just started flowering in my area. So perfect time for gathering them along with the early leaves. I don't often do this as I am so busy at this time of year. I usually just get the berries for drying and tincturing. But I might be able to find the time this year. I don't drink many teas and have never tried this one but I think it would be very pleasant.

    From what I know of hawthorn, it doesn't work like conventional hypotensive meds. It is a cardio-tonic and strengthens all of the muscles and blood vessels in the circulatory system. There are three different tincture preparations; berry tincture, flower & leaf tincture and a combination of flower & leaf that is done in the spring and then the berries are tinctured in the same alcohol in the fall. The flower & leaf tincture is most helpful if there is oedema involved. So you can tailor the tincture you make to suit your particular needs. I have made a cordial from the berries before. Much more pleasant way to take your medicine. 😀 Also, the recipe for Apple Syrup in Wild Remedies uses dried hawthorns along with blueberries. This is a nice concentrated syrup to usse as a base for a beverage while hiking to replace those electrolytes and keep the heart pumpin'.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,519 admin
    edited May 2021

    @Denise Grant Hawthorn grows wild in my area. The only hawthorn that I have here on our property is unfortunately too close to the (excessively sprayed) field and is therefore unacceptable (in my opinion) for consumption.

    It would be impossible to combat the problem in my area unless I purposely planted some more in a more sheltered area on our property and then worked on trying to protect that in particular.

    Thanks for the offer, Denise, but they would not allow that past the border!

    @torey We have the same sort of rust that affects our saskatoons. I dealt with that at the nursery, and I am pretty sure that we have had it here, but it seemed to disappear after a while.

    I think it is the apple maggot that goes after our hawthorn berries. We have discussed that on TGN before. We also have a fly that has been infesting other berries (raspberries, Nanking, etc). That discussion is also on TGN as well.

    We have red hawthorns. I would be interested in what you could find for me, Torey.

    Those recipes sound good. I still need to get that book. Thanks for reminding me to put it on my latest list.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @LaurieLovesLearning I remembered you mentioning the critter in a past discussion but was too lazy to do the search. :)

    I will ask the name of the product that a neighbour uses for her cherry trees. She is certified organic so it is a safe product. It would help with the bug in the Nankings; not sure if it would work for apples as well but it is worth investigating. I think it is likely a different fly that the one we have cause ours only goes after cherries, not raspberries. My neighbour has a commercial raspberry patch next to her cherry trees and they are all fine.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,519 admin

    @torey I have heard (and this could be incorrect on their part) that this same fly that is in the raspberries here has actually done major damage in the fruit areas in BC.

    I would be interested in knowing what the product is.

    At this point, the blooms are pretty much done and my understanding is that's when the eggs are laid. Maybe our weather will have messed with everything. I can always hope!

  • frogvalley
    frogvalley Posts: 675 ✭✭✭✭

    Thank you for the posting. I have a Hawthorn, but have never harvested any. I hope that I am more observant this year now that I am retired. I might plant a few more as I get older and find it would be a useful addition to our diet.

  • Annie Kate
    Annie Kate Posts: 680 ✭✭✭✭

    @LaurieLovesLearning and @torey I, too, would be interested in knowing what the product is. Our cherries have worms, too.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @Annie Kate

    It is called GF 150 Naturalyte with an organic version called Entrust. The active chemical in both is Spinosad but my friend thinks that the formulation of the carrier portion determines whether it is organic or not. 

    This link is for GF150 Naturalyte which is gobbed on in bait stations in the tree. It has an attractant specifically for cherry fruit flies. There’s also a section of the website for Entrust, a topical spray, and is used for control of anything in the grub/caterpillar stage. There is some concern that resistance may develop as spinosad is proving to be so good. The GF150 requires farm registration.

    https://www.corteva.ca/en/products-and-solutions/crop-protection/gf-120.html

  • Annie Kate
    Annie Kate Posts: 680 ✭✭✭✭

    Thanks @torey !