Power Outage Supplies

13

Comments

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @torey thank you for the idea of cargo pants. I really appreciate that. @RustBeltCowgirl thank a great idea!

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    prolly nothing that hasnt' already been mentioned here, but my highest priority is:

    water, food, solar chargers, a vehicle always ready for it's most important run..just in case..

    real medicine, a very most important emergency radio but even more than that, a radio and a hamm license so you can transmit as well as recieve....if the grid goes down most everyone will have lost use of their phone..you must also know how to build/make your own faraday cage..

    And.....wait for it.....CHOCOLATE 🤣

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @silvertipgrizz that last part is the most important. What if it melts? or melts together if left in the sun? I do try to add some hard candy or lifesavers and gum or mints to my pack.

  • silvertipgrizz
    silvertipgrizz Posts: 1,990 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dipat2005 While needing some time to think about this...the chocolate/melting...what comes to mind is no matter where one might be, first have the chocolate packaged very well and tight not letting in water...and partially bury it, depending on the weather, temp, pending rain....bury it deep enough to keep it cool at least, and also always consider if you are close to a cool or cold river and put what you need to keep cold in some kind of a waterproof container and weight it down until ready to consume it. Don't forget to watch the potential rise or fall of the water level so as not to expose your food to the warmer air.

    I would truely hate if I had to eat the whole thing as it would melt otherwise...of course, it could always solidify again poss in the night temps...that's a good thought you have, will keep me thinking in hopes for more ideas. Let us know if you come up with other solutions.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @torey thank you for the idea of cargo pants. That is helpful. I am a seamstress so I can take care of that idea. I have a long white belt but haven't gotten the bags for it yet. That would distribute the weight a lot better.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @silvertipgrizz my favorite place to store chocolate is in the freezer. I laughed at your reply it certainly made my day. Thank you for the many ways to store chocolate.

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,613 admin

    Hi @judsoncarroll4 I totally agree with you about the sound of generators...

    In the western end of Puerto Rico where I live power outages are a normal thing. At least once per week the power is out for a few hours. And during the rainy season the internet is down every afternoon when it rains.

    If I'm out and about or just resting I know the power has gone out as all the backup generators fire up.

    I've recently invested in a 4kWatt power system which cost about $4,000. I figure that is totally worth it. Plus it will feed excess power back into the grid saving a tiny bit on the electric bill.

    I am planning on much longer extended power outages. Everyone should. Almost all of my power tools (drills, chop saw, weed eater, chain saw, saner, etc) run on batteries. I went with the Home Depot Makita brand as the Gillispies (Lynn and her husband Tom - the farmers in Colorado) highly recommend that brand. TYom uses those tools for everything and knows they are tough.

    I am planning on rigging a deep freezer to run at higher temps - like 45 degrees F so that I can use it as a super efficient refridgerator (freezers the chest types with the lid opening from the top means all the cold stays in the bottom and it stays colder much better than normal fridges).

    Yes, definitely have some backup lights. My sister just gave me a Lucy Light which has a tiny solar panel built into it. It floats, is waterproof... inexpensive. I'm going to see if it makes sense for us to have them in the TGN store.

    Prepping never ends, does it? LOL

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,613 admin

    Hi @Cornelius I got the fire starter from Amazon... LOL. of course. Actually I bought a dozen of them and have been giving them away as gifts. They were about $10 each?

    Oh, a 5 gallon tank of propane and a small propane stove are in the works for my preps.

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭

    @Marjory Wildcraft Thank you so much! Do you have a recommended brand for the hand crank generator?

    @silvertipgrizz I agree. Chocolate will help people get through the worst of times (it is definielty a comfort food lol).

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,613 admin

    Hi @Cornelius you know I've tried some of those hand crank chargers over the years - admittedly most of them were inexpensively made. And honestly none of them worked that well. Plus it got to be a lot of work. So I opt for solar panels.

  • Sharie
    Sharie Posts: 276 ✭✭✭

    https://rense.com/general71/100.htm 100 items list. Not all are practical for everyone but a good prepper list overall.

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2021

    @Marjory Wildcraft That's too bad. I was hoping that there was a good one out there.

    @Sharie Thank you for the list!

  • lewis.mary.e
    lewis.mary.e Posts: 225 ✭✭✭

    Before we moved to the country we were townies, and I lived in fear of the power going out during the winter. We had no backup heat source. Here we have a generator. That being said, we still prepare for emergencies. We almost always have dry goods to last for a month and bottled water stored away. And we have finally started canning some of the produce we grow.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Per the recent discussion in another thread, I'll take a stab at a list of things you should try to store against electrical outages. These are listed roughly in descending order of priority.

    • Water for drinking
    • Light sources (rechargeable headlamp such as Nitecore NU25; candles; kerosene lanterns, etc.)
    • Medicines needed to maintain your health (such as any prescriptions you have)
    • Food for at least 72 hours; 2 - 4 weeks would be preferred)
    • Heat for cooking that does not need electricity (Coleman propane stove, DIY alcohol stove made from a simple can, isobutane backpacking stove, etc.)
    • Communications (such as an battery powered AM/FM radio to receive emergency updates, smartphone that can access the Internet, etc.)
    • Method of dealing with human waste liquid and solids (suggested method will depend heavily on whether you are rural or urban)
    • Electrical power source to recharge batteries for lights and radio (a single small solar panel and charge controller would be sufficient)

    What else would you put on the list? For most locations in the developed world, you are unlikely to need more than a week without power, though disruptions could interrupt the food supply chain even after power is restored.

    I suggest the list we create should focus on how to get through a week without power, not how to live for years without it; that would be a completely different topic.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    I would add toe and hand warmers to the list. I had a cold nose after 2 days and so used a cloth mask which helped.

    I need to get another blanket but the comforter was enough with enough warm clothes. I used my smartphone to access the internet and my kindle to read.

    Light was another issue as we are not supposed to use candles within our apartments (flame). We are not to have a Barbeque or Hibachi either. (I did see some on the property).

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,102 ✭✭✭✭✭

    For those looking for stronger lights or having to use flashlights but they are not bright enough... If you fill a milk style jug with water then attach a headlamp with the light facing into the jug. it will make the light brighter. You may be able to do the same thing by finding a way to attach some other type of flashlight. Not as good for outdoors but it can help brighten a room better than just the flashlight by itself.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @vickeym what a great idea! I used a flashlight which is adjustable. It also has a pulsing light and a flickering light.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,102 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dipat2005 I have several types of flashlights, including one similar to what you describe, being that we live off grid and winters are mostly dark in Alaska. lol

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,102 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Just adding an image to show my earlier comment about making more light with a jug of water.


  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @vickeym thanks for the great idea! I have never seen or heard of this before.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    It looks like you might have used a tealight (that has a battery)?

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,102 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dipat2005 if your referring to the image I posted. It is a battery powered headlamp. The strap would normally be worn around your head.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @vickeym thank you. I have known about battery powered headlamps but didn't know what they looked like. Thank you for enlightening me.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,633 admin

    I was just at a friend's house and she showed me this set-up. It has 3 lights and the battery/power unit will charge cell phones as well as pick up FM radio. Very compact and easy to use.


  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @Torey thank you. Several things in one. Great idea and too spendy for me. That means there are more things out there like this.

    I learned a lot about what I need when something like this happens again.

  • mart85
    mart85 Posts: 52 ✭✭✭

    I went off grid about 2 years ago. I run 2 solar systems either one can get me by running fridge and bare min of what I need.


    I have multiple backups from solar lights to flash lights, my favorite ones are the ones that use 18650 batteries - lithium. I also have candles, and flashlights that have solar cells, and one that is hand cranked, I keep these in my van as I think of my van as my 2nd home. I have slept in my van as practice bug out for hurricanes, and I found it best with a lazyboy chair as I can sleep no problems with it and shades over the windows.


    But being off grid I am always functioning with the "power off"... has shown me how to use power on a budget.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,277 ✭✭✭✭

    @mart85 Good for you. I think it would be great to live off grid. When we owned our last home we had a high wind that knocked out power temporarily and we cooked inside a very large wood fireplace with our cast iron pans. I loved that fireplace!

  • mart85
    mart85 Posts: 52 ✭✭✭

    I adore cast iron. Hard to imagine life without my dutch oven, large frying pan, and grill.


    I am a firm believer in plan B.


    Plan C even better.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,102 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Another lighting option we have and really like is the Aladdin brand oil lamp with a mantle instead of a wick. They are not cheap but they put off a good amount of light and if course some heat as well. We find they give better light than a wick style lamp and have used them back when we did not have our battery and inverter system and long before our solar panels. This is one style. Obviously they can be purchased from others and there are different models, with and without additional decorative lamp shades.


  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,633 admin

    I have one of those @vickeym. I have a shade for it as well. Haven't used it for a long time.

    I also have one of these. It doesn't have a mantle but it has a 26 hour burn when full and a safety measure that puts it out if it gets tipped over.