GMO vs. Hybrid

I was not sure where to put this discussion so I put it under growing methods since it directly affects what we eat.

I have a gardening blog on Facebook which is mostly about what I am doing in my garden but right now I am not doing much so I have been posting things about what has been going on and this is going to be next week's post.

One of the things I find that most people are confused about is the difference between GMO and Hybrid, so while researching for the best explanation I came across the following chart from the article “Difference Between GMO and Hybrid” that was posted by Samanthi, March 20, 2017 which I thought was great -

If you would like to read the entire article here is the link –

 Difference Between GMO and Hybrid | Compare the Difference Between Similar Terms

Comments

  • kbmbillups1
    kbmbillups1 Posts: 1,377 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I do not trust anything GMO & go out of my way including paying more not to buy anything GMO.

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @kbmbillups1 I am there with you!

  • annbeck62
    annbeck62 Posts: 1,023 ✭✭✭✭

    I agree, I don't purchase anything GMO.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,518 admin

    I know a lady who insisted that they are the same. No matter how I explained it, she was convinced.

    I found that you do have to be wary of wording, however, as the GMO companies will try to muddle the definitions to bypass the GMO label and even be able to be planted as "Organic" (Canada does not allow known GMO seed to be planted as organic seed). This fiddling is part of how the GMO wheat can be passed off as not. I don't remember what they call it, but is officially not GMO even though that is exactly what it is if you follow the trail. I am pretty sure that I posted on that in a discussion here in the past.

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @Lisa K thanks for pointing out the differences. As @LaurieLovesLearning suggests, labelling laws are a bit dodgy, worldwide it seems. I always try to go heirloom 1st, hybrid if I have no choice and never touch GMO.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,518 admin

    I should mention that seed companies for gardeners will not sell GMO. There is too much at stake for the GMO companies, first of all, the potential loss of money. Gardeners like to save seed, and they would be more difficult to keep track of than a farmer, and those companies don't want to lose track of where their product unds up. Big companies have you sign agreements, one point is of course, in those agreements is not to save seed.

    I think you are pretty safe with a garden seed company. It's the big ag companies that you have to watch out for.

    I am not sure how they work trees or shrubs, though. Many of those sold have patents so the person who developed them gets royalties (I worked for a gentleman that got royalties for developing a particular green ash...hybrid, possibly a type of tame Saskatoon too. I know it was his "baby," but I never asked further). I know that some sale tags specifically indicate no replication is legal (I saw this on a lacy type of elderberry), but that is because of the royalty (hybrid) status, not gmo in those cases.

    As with sprouting a GMO fruit from seed (say, papaya...isn't that the fruit with lots of gmo varieties?) at the store, I don't know how that would go. I've never looked into that.

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Good question @LaurieLovesLearning, I guess it would depend on where you get the fruit or the fruit tree, I am not to sure I would trust the Big Box Stores unless is says it is certified non-GMO, smaller nurseries such as our local Armstrong I trust, their practice organic growing and even go so far as to only label the plants organic if they can assure there is no contamination from growers near them.

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭

    I'm gonna be devils advocate for a minute a say techincally all food is artificially manipulated in the fact that humans select the traits that they express. GMO is modified by genetic engineering to add a gene previously not in the species (this can be from any other organism). I used to believe that they would not put something harmful in them and then I found out that they made a corn that if you eat causes sterilization so.... there's that. I have heard of some seed companies selling GMO seed and then saying somewhere on their site that you can't save the seeds if it is GMO (the goal could be to make it so people can't save seed any more). Because of this I like heirloom varieties. Hybrid just mean that they have two different alleles (versions of a gene) for the same trait (gene). There offspring could then have 1 of 3 possible combinations if crossed with another hybrid (2 domanite, 1 dominate:1 recessive, 2 recessive) (note: this is only for one trait with 2 alleles). The middle goup would therefore also be a hybrid, but only for that one trait (this then becomes very complicated with the thousands of genes organisms have).

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @Lisa K thank you fo starting this discussion. I think that GMO plants are dangerous to people in whatever form. Sometimes they say “it’s just for feeding animals” but who eats the animals. If we eat anything genetically modified then it can modify our genes. And there is nothing wrong with hybrids. Especially the natural ones. Especially when it is done by bees.

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Cornelius my understanding is that GMO seeds were originally developed to help create hardy crops especially for 3rd world countries but greed seems to get the better of some people and that is when I think they became harmful.

    @jowitt.europe you are very welcome, I felt it was an important topic. I must say that GMO plants used for feeding animals is another reason why I am glad I became a vegetarian over 30 years ago 😁

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @Lisa K Now and again I am considering whether I should also become a vegetarian, but it would be difficult for my husband and cooking two different meals every time would also be not that easy. But we buy meat directly from farmers whome we know and who keep their cows on alpine meadows and on alpine hay in winter and some game from the local forest. We never have meet more than once per week. And, hopefully, nothing genetically modified.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @Lisa K @Cornelius the greed has destroyed the 3rd world countries, before starting profiting from “humanitarian help” by producing and selling unhealthy food to help organisations. “The road to Heck is paved with good intentions”. This is also how gas was developed during the World War I. They started with ammonium as a fertiliser.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    One type of wording to watch out for on GMOs is "organically grown." If everything but the GMO seeds is organic, they can say it.

  • frogvalley
    frogvalley Posts: 675 ✭✭✭✭

    @Tave Here in the United States, if we don't like a label, what it means or think it might hurt our bottom line (greed), we just legislate around it. That's why knowing your farmer is so important.

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @frogvalley very true, it seems it is easier to get the Legislators to do something not in the publics benefit than it is to get them to the right thing!

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭

    @Lisa K and @jowitt.europe I agree that it started with good intentions. They made a rice called Golden Rice and it has Beta-carotene in it to help fight malnutrition of Vitamin A. It has never been grown on a actual farm for fear of it reproducing with nonGMO plants. I think it is cool technology and it could do a lot of good, but for every inch we can go into the light we can equally descend into the dark (in other words we are capable of incredible good or evil in equal amounts).

  • Lisa K
    Lisa K Posts: 1,917 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Cornelius very true and well said.