Another take on growing vine crops

JodieDownUnder
JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

I recently came across this article on growing pumpkin, squash, beans, melons,cucumbers etc. I think it’s a nifty way to lift the crops off the ground, possible space saving and you know where the growing point is, so you can water and fertilise. The metal frame work would be available in most agriculture supply stores or hardware. Could be some laying around on property. Just bend them over to form an arch and attach with star post ( t post ) and wire up to secure. You could either do raised beds on the outside of each side or prepare a bed at ground level. If the produce got too heavy, a stocking sling could support. Looks good too! Does anyone grow using this system?


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Comments

  • Sharie
    Sharie Posts: 276 ✭✭✭

    Not yet but I want too. I have a very high raised bed on a hill with a butternut squash plant and it's amazing how strong the stems are to hold up such heavy squashes. The plant is well over a year old and gives us a steady supply.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That is beautiful. It's obviously spring here in the Southern hemisphere, and my first squash plant just broke ground. I plan on harvesting the flowers, though, because it's where people can steal the squash. Last year I found out squash blossoms sauteed in butter are delicious.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin

    @JodieDownUnder Very cool idea but I'm just a bit outside the zone where I can grow winter squash or pumpkin and definitely not melons of any kind. For me, it would be beans.

    @Tave Have you had them stuffed & deepfried?

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @torey, I haven't, but if I get enough of them at one time, I will definitely try them.

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Melissa Norris uses this method for somethings. She has some videos about it. I have wanted to try it but haven't yet. This picture looks a lot more pretty than the few that I have seen. That is definitely a look to shoot for. Thank you for reminding me of the idea @JodieDownUnder I had planned on setting it up next spring but forgot all about it! Are you planning on trying it?

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,542 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I grow a lot on trellises any more. I find I have less insect issues, more space and a cool look. I can also toss plastic over top when it get late in to the season and cover crops fast. I use old trampolines for a hoop or cattle pannels on pallets. Its cheap and sturdy. ( my first trellis fell over because I had no idea how heavy the veggies could get.)

    Another positive about growing on trellises, I find crops are easier to harvest. They are easier to see and if toward the top will hang down for easy picking

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @Michelle D I’m trying to work out where I’d put it, so hopefully at the very latest next season.

    @Tave &. @torey I have been known to harvest zucchini flowers, stuff with a mixture of ricotta, pine nuts and some fresh herbs. Dip in egg and breadcrumbs and fry in olive oil. A delicate operation but worth it if you have an abundance.

    @Sharie what an amazing butternut squash plant. What’s your secret?

    @Monek Marie your right, better harvesting height and can protect easier if you need to.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JodieDownUnder what a great idea a fabulous picture. I have never thought of this. How novel!

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin
  • Sharie
    Sharie Posts: 276 ✭✭✭

    No secret. I haven't done anything special for it at all. I guess it just likes that spot.

  • annbeck62
    annbeck62 Posts: 1,028 ✭✭✭✭

    Great idea. Thanks for sharing :)

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,617 admin

    beautiful!!!

    I love making these too. Here is one year when I grew jonathan squash on an arched trellis like that. Those trellises willhold a lot of weight.


  • kbmbillups1
    kbmbillups1 Posts: 1,396 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wow! That's beautiful!! I have a cattle panel that I'm trying to grow a kiwi vine on. Nothing is growing on the other side. Going to try growing something on that side next summer. I hope I'm even half a successful as you!!

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,617 admin

    I've not been successful growing kiwi (I was trying to do it in Central Texas during an extreme drought which might have been the problem? LOL). But I've heard they are very heavy vines and you'll need significant support.

    I think cow panels would do it? And some heavy grade t-posts? Most the the photos I've seen of popel growing kiwis have serious think poles for support.

    Good luck!

  • kbmbillups1
    kbmbillups1 Posts: 1,396 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Marjory Wildcraft Thanks. So far I just have a vine with no fruit but that's what all of my other fruit trees are doing too except my blueberry bushes. I'm hoping next year will be the year!

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 2021

    I'm interested in any kind of "vertical" gardening to grow more in less space.

    I grew more pole beans this year, and the freezer is rapidly filling up with beans!

    Getting the varieties right helps, too. Fortex and Emerite are winners here, and Lazy Housewife also does well. Kentucky Wonder, not so much.

    Now if someone would just breed a variety of pea that produces all summer despite the heat!

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm hoping to try this come spring at our new place here.

    I've heard of nothing but good things in growing vining crops this way.😊

  • Merin Porter
    Merin Porter Posts: 1,026 admin

    Love this idea -- especially with raised beds on either side of it. Something tall enough to walk under, but not so tall that attaching slings would be overly difficult. I wonder if it would be out of the question to make it wide enough so that you could have a little park bench under there so you could sit and enjoy cooler temps when it's hot outside?

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @Merin Porter park bench great idea. How about a long table so you could host a long lunch!

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I asked my new neighbor where the previous owners had their garden. He showed me the spot and said he'd be happy to till it for me to help get all the kudzu, weed trees and such out. I said sure, thanks. When I came back to look at the area the next day I couldn't believe the amount he had tilled, around 6000sqft.😲

    I've only done an area about a 100sqft at the most and decided I prefer raised beds. So I am thinking tons of raised beds and a tunnel of those pannels down the middle. But with the amount of space, I could probably do two tunnels that are about 100ft long with raised beds on either side.😄

    But we'll see, I'm still in the planning stage. Trying to figure out the best way to use the space. I currently have a cover crop of rye and red clover starting to come up in that area now, which I spread myself. I've never done that before so it was fun. Then a few days later we had some good rain. It rained a couple of days in a row in fact and the seeds are coming up! It's so exciting to watch!

    I'm just having to make sure the wild turkeys are staying out of there and not eating it all up.😕

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,991 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The benefit of a large garden is that you don't need every square foot of soil to be as productive as possible. You can spread your plants out, giving both their root systems and above ground parts room to grow. In dry periods, you won't have to water as often.

    You don't need to obsess over getting your soil to be super fertile, as you would if growing plants at extremely high density.

    However, building raised beds for the whole area may be more work than necessary. If you do decide on raised beds, remember that you don't need wood or other barriers. Just build up the beds with a hoe.

  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭

    I have a couple of cattle panel arches and my garden fence is made of cattle panels. I keep trying to get my squashes to climb but all they are interested in is going through the panel!

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I love this method. I have wanted to do this for many years. Maybe when I get my large garden space ready here I can find a way to try this.

  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭

    I will try this next year. I had a vine this year, but it didn't produce female flowers until about a month ago (fortunatly I have access to my schools greenhouse and I am growing it in there).

  • Paradox
    Paradox Posts: 187 ✭✭✭

    i need to work on this aspect next year!

  • MissPatricia
    MissPatricia Posts: 318 ✭✭✭

    Beautiful picture! I had spaghetti squash growing on mine. I have seen where one gardener used metal shelves for her pumpkins to rest on, off of the ground. I'd like to try that this coming year. I grew about 30 pumpkins with 14 of them weighing 15 lbs. or more. The biggest was 43 lbs. I am not sure how they would fare growing on a trellis.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,604 admin
    edited October 2021

    Our oldest did this and it was very gritty. She tried to rinse whatever sand she could off of the blossoms, but I guess didn't get it all. 😆 She was quite disappointed.

    @JodieDownUnder I've seen bras used to support the melons. It added a touch of humor to the garden.

    @MissPatricia If they get too large, possibly a sling or hammock of some sort could be rigged to support larger pumpkins & melons.

    I've wanted to do this for many years. One day...

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @LaurieLovesLearning Yeah! Sand in food is no good. I don't usually see blossoms lying on the ground. And you have to harvest them in the morning before they start wilting.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,604 admin

    @Tave I think with it being so dry, the sand was blown at/onto them & just stuck.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That makes sense.