Herbal mixture for immune system

Whether strong or weak, hardened or not... one day one catches cold. And then it is not easy to get rid of it. Not for me. I did inhalations, I drank teas for cough, sore throat, had a piece of Masterwort root in my mouth during the night, drank my nasturtium tincture.... and made a mixture for strengthening my immune system. After one week the cold is gone! Everything helped, but the real change came, when I started drinking my mixture for boosting immune system. This is what I used: blackberry leaves as basis, sage, echinacea, oregano, turmeric root and galangal root. It definitely helped me.

what are your formulas for boosting immune system?

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Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin

    @jowitt.europe Which species are you referring to as Masterwort?

    When I make my veggie broths/stocks I always add in nettles, astragalus root, burdock, dandelion, slices of reishi (or turkey tail), ginger, lots of onions and garlic, turmeric (if I have it), cayenne or chili peppers, etc. So good when you aren't feeling good. Nourishing and easy to take.

    When I make elderberry syrup, I will add other things to it, to bump up the medicinal properties. Star anise, cinnamon, ginger, dried rose hips, etc.

    I was in a bigger city recently and found galangal in a grocery store. I'd never seen it before. Looks so much like ginger.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,467 admin

    @torey I mean peucedanum ostruthium or Imperatoria ostruthium, masterwort. This is my favourite medicine for sore throat.

    thank you for sharing what you use for broth. I have to expand on putting more roots into it.

    Dried galangal root is one of my favourite for hot drinks and tinctures. I have never seen the fresh one, but the dried one differs a lot from ginger. It is very dark and the smell is very different. Sometimes I exhale it when I have a running nose.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    What a great thread. I need to start adding more to my elderberry syrup and making more broths. Have not done much with the teas yet as our garden was almost non existent this year. Our normal go to for immune boosting has been elderberry syrup, just a basic recipe, and fire cider to which I add all kinds of things depending on what I have on hand.

    My last batch had not only the horseradish, jalapeno, onion, turmeric, garlic, lemon and ACV mixture but I added nettle, echinacea, oregano, sage, black pepper, blueberries, oranges, basil and I think a couple other things I have forgotten.

    I was originally ordering herbs from Mountain Rose Herbs but they do not ship flat rate and their shipping is just too high. The last order I was going to place was about $100 in herbs and the shipping was going to cost me about $75. Same order could have shipped Flat rate through the postal service for about $25 to $30. Still trying to find a good source with better shipping rates for the things I cannot grow or have not had time to.

    One of my main goals this spring will be to get a large garden established.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,498 admin

    I have a bit of a head cold right now. I'm finding a natural juniper berry infused gin to work well.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,467 admin
    edited October 2021

    @judsoncarroll4 gin pure or gin tonic😉. Good for cold and for good mood.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,467 admin

    @vickeym What an excellent idea - getting a garden with herbs. I am all for growing my own herbs. It saves shipping costs and you know that you have all the herbs without pesticides, herbicides... you know which year you collected the herbs... If there is a possibility to grow or collect in nature, nothing can be better than that.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,498 admin

    Lots of juniper berries and tips infused in vodka to make the gin. Tonic with quinine.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2021

    @jowitt.europe Living in Alaska does have its perks and its issues. We have long summer days to the point that some nights it barely gets dusk before the sun is coming up again. But summer is also a short season. Many plants will not grow here and shipping can be very expensive here. But those long days also means that what does grow here, usually does very well here.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,467 admin

    @vickeym you know, these stereotypes 😉! For me Alaska has always meant a very cold, almost always under snow place, etc, etc. I am so glad to be in this network and being able to communicate with people like you from Alaska and now your part of the world is changing it’s image in my mind. I see it as a very sunny and, most probably also a very warm place during summers. Suitable for growing plants, herbs. Of course, one can read about places in google, etc, but learning through small personal examples makes such a difference.

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @jowitt.europe I try to always have on hand elderberry syrup and fire cider. You know that little nagging feeling you get at the very start of a cold, then I slip straight to the fridge and take a mouthful, definitely works! I drink Chaga mushroom tea first thing every day and swap my herbal teas around, nettle, oat straw, astragalus, lemon ginger honey. Lots of garlic!! In everything.

    I have certainly added herbs- medicinal plants to our garden and orchard, since starting with TGN, so I can go and pick fresh when needed and try to incorporate them into our meals everyday or just to graze on while I’m in the garden. Lemon balm, oregano, skull cap, gotu kola, motherwort, burdock, rosemary, elderberry, garlic, dandelion. At the moment I have stinging nettle seeds germinating to add to the collection. Easy to pick fresh herbs and add to the morning smoothie. Keeping a healthy gut, helps most ailments.

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I love all the information in this thread! So very helpful!

    Thank you!😘

  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭

    I'm not familiar with masterwort. I looked it up and I see why I don't know it since it isn't native to my area. The information in this thread is very useful. Learn something new every day. I like to use my elderberry elixir my fire cider, as well as thieves oil. I also like to put extra thyme in my cooking. In a pinch, or if I am definitely coming down with "it" I will suck on a zinc tablet.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,467 admin

    @JodieDownUnder @vickeym @JennyT Upstate South Carolina isn’t it wonderful! One in Australia, one in Alaska, one in Austria, one in South Caroline... @marjstratton where are you?

    and we all have so much in common. And, despite of geographical distances we all have stinging nettle - a source of health and energy, it seems that we all have elderberry syrup or elixier, dandelion, etc. And then we hear from each other about new plants and possibilities to integrate them into our medicinal cupboards or kitchens.

    @JodieDownUnder I am not sure whether I really know what is fire cider. It must be from apples. I make apple vinegar. Is it something in this direction? Do you find Chaga mushroom in your surroundings?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin

    The Herbal Academy just posted a page on Herbal Allies for Colder Months with suggestions on items to have in your herbal apothecary.


  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭

    @jowitt.europe I am in Washington state in the northwest of the US. Masterwort could probably be grown here. I just have never encountered it. Definitely have stinging nettles and Dandelions and use them quite a bit

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,467 admin

    here in the Alps Masterwort grows quite high up 1600 m above sea level. It likes wet feet, thus grows somewhere near mountain creeks. My friend wanted to have it in her garden in Luxembourg. So far she is successful. It grows.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,467 admin

    @torey thank you very much! I feel somehow ashamed that I did not search for discussions on fire cider myself 🤭

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin

    @jowitt.europe No worries! Sometimes we can all forget about the resources that TGN provides. I was googling something the other day and one of the links that came up was in TGN's blog. So I hadn't thought to check our own resources, too.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    jowitt.europe There are so many things we can learn from each other. I love that we are from such far flung and diverse places but all come or end up here with such similar interests.

    We have red elderberry that grows wild here and folks here do use it syrups and such. I was gifted a couple of black elderberry plants last summer by a dear friend in South Dakota. So far they are doing well. I have them mulched and in a raised bed. Praying they survive here.

    I know nettles grow wild here though I have not yet found any. So for now, I bought seeds I can plant next spring. Lots of folks here complain about chickweed, that it takes over large areas on their property. I also have not found that on my property and ended up buying seeds.

    Hoping to find a way to get mullein to grow here, along with a few other things, but I'm not sure our season is long enough. We do however grow record sized cabbage and pumpkins on a pretty regular basis up here. Every year our state fair has a weigh off. Many times the pumpkins are around or over 1000 pounds. Here is a link to an article about this years winner, well over 1000 pounds!

    https://www.alaskasnewssource.com/2021/08/31/reigning-champion-wins-again-with-1600-pound-pumpkin/

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @torey Thank you for that link about what to have in your herbal apothecary for winter. I've always wondered about that. I knew the elderberry syrup and fire cider were some of the things but did know about the others this is awesome.😘

    @vickeym Those pumpkins are the biggest I've ever seen! That they can get that huge is unreal!😄

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,153 ✭✭✭✭✭

    JennyT Upstate South Carolina In 2012 a local man set the world record 138.25-pound cabbage. Our long summer days give us a bit of "reward" for putting up with the long cold winter with dark days. lol

    We won't even get into the zuchini. LOL

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,467 admin

    @vickeym It is amazing how plants adapt to the climate conditions!!!

  • nicksamanda11
    nicksamanda11 Posts: 755 ✭✭✭✭

    Good ideas on here.

  • water2world
    water2world Posts: 1,186 ✭✭✭✭

    Thanks for all of these timely suggestions! I have made a file and keeping them handy!

  • thelinda
    thelinda Posts: 21 ✭✭

    Have purchased from Mountain Rose Herbs for many years. I have been happy with purchases from Penn Herb Co. https://www.pennherb.com/ and from Bulk Herb Store https://www.bulkherbstore.com. I got some Chamomile that was packaged in a plastic bag then put into a cardboard box. I could smell the chamomile without opening the box... I am not up-to-date on anyone's shipping costs though....

  • MissPatricia
    MissPatricia Posts: 318 ✭✭✭

    I never thought of adding wild things like dandelion to bone broth; I would add "food" herbs like onion, garlic, turmeric; now I am going to have to remember to use things like blackberry leaf, dandelion (guess I might have thought to use the leaf but not the root). Sounds brilliant. How many of you make the broth but seldom use it? I use mine mainly for delicious soups.

  • SuperC
    SuperC Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 fine black pepper and warm vodka after a hot shower then to bed

  • SuperC
    SuperC Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭

    Immune builder/Sore throat relief; 1T cinnamon, 1T raw honey, 1T powdered garlic, 1T turmeric, 1T powdered onion, 1/2T cayenne, 1T powdered ginger and 1cup of warm to hot water. Stir stir stir as it the ingredients will not dissolve, and drink. Mmmmm good

    sore throat relief: bite into a clove of garlic, and suck out the juice. Or, consume 1T raw honey.

    sinus relief: chew up and swallow a one-inch sprig of fresh rosemary.