Jerusalem artichokes harvested. What now?

jowitt.europe
jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin
edited November 2021 in General Recipes

Yesterday I harvested my Jerusalem artichokes. Three buckets full! I am going to cover them with sand for storing and keep them in a cool place. But what now? We love them fried or baked, but there are so many! @nksunshine27 some time ago you mentioned that you have a recipe for pickling Jerusalem artichokes. Have you tried that out? Is there any other way to preserve them? Any ideas?


Comments

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,116 ✭✭✭✭✭

    They look great. Would anyone know where to get seeds or starter plants? I have not been able to find any here so far.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @vickeym Following is a link to an article about growing JA in Alaska. The writer bought hers at her local grocery store in the produce section.

    I found this Canadian site who may ship to Alaska. I have contacted them to be put on the spring wait list. I didn't realize there were more varieties. There are tips for propagation and a list of health benefits.

    If you can't find any by spring, let me know and I will try to send you some via mail.

    For @jowitt.europe who has too many JAs, there were recipe links posted on the same website.


  • Cornelius
    Cornelius Posts: 872 ✭✭✭✭

    Here are 2 videos on how to grow and preserve Jerusalem artichokes (flatulence not included 😂).

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYV6C2Gwu2Q

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,116 ✭✭✭✭✭

    torey Thank you for the link. I will have to ask our produce manager if he can order them. I tried contacting the woman's blog site and there has been no activity since 2014. But I used to live in the same little town and they are not that far from us, only about 55 miles. So hopefully I can find some and get them to grow here. Of course it would help to eat a few first and see if we even like them.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @Tave thank you for the pickling recipes. I read them carefully and there is a way to get rid of the bloating, caused by eating them raw or cooked.

    @torey thank you! I have already tried out the chips. Very successful. They disappeared in no time. I used a lot of powdered caraway against bloating and herbal salt. Hummus would be next. So far I have always made Hummus from chickpeas.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Lucky you! I dug up my one sunchoke when it died back at the end of the season, and only found one tuber. I replanted it and we'll see what happens next year.

    Of course, there may be more tubers that I missed under the heavy clay. The sunchoke was growing near a fence, and I've read that these plants like to form their tubers at a spot where the roots reach a barrier, such as a wall or fence.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @VermontCathy I would dig deeper. When I was harvesting mine, I thought I have dug out all the tubers and then, when I started digging deeper, I found many, many more. They “travel” with their tubers - this is how they spread. Quite and invasive plant. But I like it. My bees too!

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,116 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @torey did you ever get the sunchokes? If so, how did they do for you?

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin
    edited November 2022

    @torey thank you for reminding. This is my harvesting week as after a very mild October we are going to have some real autumn. Time to pickle sunchokes!

    @vickeym Yes! How are your sunchokes?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @vickeym Yes, I got 2 kinds. White and red. I didn't know they came in red before this season.

    We dug one plant and discovered that they go soft and wrinkly very quickly. They need to be stored in a cool place, like the fridge, which I didn't know in advance. So I haven't dug any more. We will have to see about proper storage for them. I'm thinking a bucket of damp sand in a root cellar might do as well as in the fridge. But they will be OK in the ground till next year.

    The plants themselves got very tall. Well over 10 feet by the end of the season. Nice yellow sunflower tops.

    If you can get your hands on some roots, I think they would do quite well for you. Do you have a root cellar?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @jowitt.europe I hadn't thought of pickling them. Care to share a recipe?

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've read that sunchoke tubers are best stored in the ground, then dug shortly before using.

    Unfortunately that wouldn't work for gardeners in cold climates, because the tubers haven't formed in summer and the ground is frozen too hard in winter to dig.

    Putting them in a bucket of dry sand sounds interesting. They think they're in soil and stay quiescent for winter, but easily be dug.

    My copy of Putting Food By says they can be frozen using the same methods as freezing small turnips.

    Pickling, or possibly pressure cooking, sounds like the best approach. But none of my canning books gives recipes or canning instructions, do it's hard to know what would be safe.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,116 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 2022

    Don't have a root cellar, yet. Hoping to get one built this spring after breakup season. Need much more space for food storage. I had no idea they came in red either.

    @jowitt.europe Was not able to get mine planted this year. Found them and purchased but they came too late and didn't have a "safe" place to plant by then. Hubby had rented a front end loader and most areas were not safe places. Mine were hard, dry little cut pieces. Not what was shown in the picture. (Ordered on Amazon, everyone else was out of stock.) Will have to look into storage ideas over the winter.

  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭

    Wow, that sound like a great harvest. Jerusalem artichokes are on my to-try list.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @vickeym @VermontCathy I have experience in keeping sunchokes in damp sand over winter and it works very well. I do not even need to put them into a cellar. I keep in a storage room which is not heated during winter, but never gets frost and they keep there very well. In spring they start developing shoots.

    @torey the recipe is in this discussion. @Tave shared it last year. I did not manage to try out last year, but now I have more time.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    Thanks @jowitt.europe I just need to pay more attention. :)

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @torey if you try - please, do tell how you like it. It is my plan for today to start the process.

  • Owl
    Owl Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

    I’ve got to recapture mine. I had them in a big planter but it got spilled and now they are moving to take over the yard. I’ll have to use the excavator to even hope to catch them all because our clay is impossible to dig and it’s impressive that they were even able to live there!

  • brighidsgarden
    brighidsgarden Posts: 2 ✭✭✭

    I’ve just fermented a jar full. Found this recipe on YouTube - Just pack the jar with whole scrubbed Jerusalem artichokes, about halfway through add any seeds (I used peppercorns and fennel) and other flavourings (I used peeled garlic cloves, lemon slices and chilli peppers) and cover with brine - 1 tablespoon of salt to every 1pint of water. I haven’t tried it yet but smells good 😊

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @brighidsgarden welcome to the forum and how exciting- you do the same as I do!

    I have already stored my fermented Jerusalem artichokes in jars. After the first fermentation with herbs, I changed the brine, rinsed artichokes and left in brine with herbs for another 3 days. Then heated the brine to 80C ,poured onto Jerusalem artichokes in jars, added an oak leaf and a garlic clove into each and closed tightly. Before I closed them, I tasted a few. Delicious! I am sure that after a few months in cellar they will be even better!

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @Owl well that is a disadvantage of Jerusalem artichokes. They spread. So far they caused no problem for me, as I gave them a territory which is, somehow limited. Hopefully they will not spread beyond.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Owl @jowitt.europe I will be interested to see what happens with my Jerusalem artichokes.

    I had a lot of trouble getting them started because the voles kept eating the bulbs. After moving them inside the garden fence, they did well. This fall I dug up many of them and transplanted them in far corners of the yard, outside the fence, where I would like to see them spread. It remains to be seen if the voles will get them in all of those locations.

    I left some inside the fence to keep a new supply coming.

    I expect that it will be easy to keep them under control in the lawn, just by regular mowing.

    Both David the Good's reports and my own experience agree that Jerusalem artichokes love heavy clay and will happily drill holes in it to form large tubers.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @VermontCathy Regular mowing is a good idea for stopping Jerusalem artichokes spreading. It will weaken the roots and after some time they will they will vanish. When I have time, I pull out young plants from the place I do not want them to spread, if they grow in my flower bed.