Menopause: Menstrual Flooding

LaurieLovesLearning
LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,604 admin
edited January 2022 in Women's Health

Here is a really great article on this subject.

Hysterectomy, which can lead to other problems such as prolapse, is often the conventional answer when it isn't always necessary. It's kind of like C-sections...not needed as often as done, and potentially dangerous. My thoughts are that one should try these friendly herbs first before going that route.

Another article can be found here:

As always, do your research and be very familiar with the safety of any herb and any combinations.

I generally drink red raspberry leaf tea & nettle together. It is easy to forage both of those here. I'd be curious to know how that tastes with ginger. I've got all right now, so it will be on my list of things to try today.

Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin

    This is a very important topic. Thanks for bringing it up @LaurieLovesLearning.

    I think ginger will go very well in your combination tea.

    If we can do anything to prevent surgeries, its a good thing. Not just for our bodies but our wallets, too. Depending on the type of medical services available, surgery is expensive for many people. Not just the bills but time off work as well. And of course, the pricey meds that go with surgeries.

    I have been made aware recently of how expensive sanitary products have become. For some families who are struggling to put food on the table, these products might not be in the budget. If you are using more than you need, this could be an even bigger challenge.

    Great suggestions in these articles. And many are "weeds" that we can easily harvest if budget is a concern. Raspberry, nettle, yarrow, shepherd's purse. A herbalist friend of mine recommends a cup of yarrow tea for all women, once a month towards the end of your cycle. A couple of others that I would add to the list are Self-heal (Prunella vulgaris), Burnet (Sanguisorba canadensis or S. officinalis), Lady's Mantle (Alchemilla vulgaris or A. subcrenata) and Wintergreens (Pyrola species, not Gaultheria species)

    Nettle is great for the anemia that will accompany heavy blood loss but another really good one is yellow dock (Rumex crispus). Its one of the best herbs for improving iron (caution: it also has laxative properties).

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,604 admin
    edited January 2022

    @torey Are you aware of any combination "recipes" out there for use for this purpose if anyone wanted to do the foraged weeds/herbal route?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin

    Michael Moore’s Herbal Formulas for Clinic and Home has a formula for early menopause with erratic cycles and flooding, among 34 pages of other formulas. It can be accessed at:

    I don’t have this book (yet) and the reviews I have read suggest that it is a more advanced book for practitioners rather than the home herbalist. The Herbalist Guide to Formulary by Holly Bellebuono. Lots of formulas.

    This is a link to a Shepherd’s Purse monograph from Thomas Easley’s Eclectic School which has very good info.

    If I were making a general formula for heavy bleeding using local ingredients (wild foraged or garden plants) I would probably include: equal parts each of raspberry leaf, nettle leaf, shepherd’s purse and yarrow. However, you can personalize this formula to suit the individual. If cramping is associated with this I would add one part of cramp bark or if it is more spasms rather than cramping, then you could add valerian or spearmint. If nervous tension is part of the picture, motherwort or valerian would be a good addition. If depression or headaches are an issue, then add lemon balm to the formula. Some formulas may contain wild yam. If this isn't available in your area as a local herb, I would substitute red clover. Very good for balancing hormones, also high in iron.

    If anemia is becoming an issue because of excessive blood loss (and this is certainly an issue for many women), I would make a separate formula for that and alternate with the menorrhagia formula. An anemia formula could contain 2 parts nettle, 1 part yellow dock, 1 part dandelion, 1 part oats (oat straw or milky tops). Alfalfa contains Vitamin K and is high in iron, so it’s good to add to bleeding formulas.

    These formulas could be made into tinctures or teas. The formula for anemia could be made as an acetum so that it could be taken as is by the spoonful or used in food medicine as a dressing base for salads or steamed veggies. Vinegar is better at extracting minerals than alcohol. 

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,604 admin

    Hah! 😄👍 I wondered if red clover shoild be in this list because of its properties. I had added it to my raspberry leaf-nettle tea mix until I ran out. It make it taste much better.

    I have often used both herbs combined because I know it's healthy (learned about it while expecting). I added red clover once I learned about how good it was.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,604 admin

    @torey Just for clarification, because not everyone knows all the herbalist lingo, can you give a definition of acetum?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin

    Sorry, acetum is just another name for a herbal vinegar.