I LOVE making and cooking with homemade bone broth!

Owl
Owl Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

I make lots of venison bone broth every year and I have always wondered why mine doesn’t ever have the typical jellied appearance? I recently had to break down and buy a bottle of store bought broth and it was way more solid than any of the types I do, including chicken, beef, turkey and venison. I use a pressure cooker and cook it for hours and hours! Could it be the vegetables? I use lots of “elbows and bellybuttons” of carrots, celery and onions from other cooking as well as mushrooms, ginger and/or turmeric if I have any fresh.

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Comments

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭✭

    @Owl I am glad that you posted this question. The last time I made bone broth or tried to there was no jelly and although I used chicken bones, I must have used a lot more vegetables than bones. That is the only reason it was more liquified. I too will be interested to see what comments are posted.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    Try adding a bit of acid to your starting liquid. ACV. White or red wine (depending on the bones). Not enough to taste any sourness or taste any alcohol. Just enough to start dissolving the collagen and natural gelatin in the bones. A couple of tablespoon for every gallon or two of water should be enough.

  • Owl
    Owl Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

    I usually use that much or more, especially if I’m roasting raw bones before extracting the broth.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    Sorry, I have no other suggestions to offer @Owl. Its what I do with mine. I use the same added veg and maybe more. Lots of the usual spices; bay leaf, thyme, sage, savory, tarragon, ginger, pinch of hot pepper, etc. Only difference is that I don't use a pressure cooker. Mine sits in a pot on the back of the wood stove all day. So it varies how hard it boils/simmers depending on where the pot gets bumped to for cooking other things and how hot I've got the stove burning for household heating. But not sure how that would account for the difference in gelling.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    Excellent!

  • Owl
    Owl Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

    I wonder if it’s the pressure cooker…I cook with propane and never wanted to keep it going long enough but I’m going to have to experiment now. Just for the sake of clarity, does anyone get gelling with venison? I have talked to someone before who said they had never had theirs gel either. I wonder who?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    I have cooked with a variety of bones including game. Most of it is now bison. Never had an issue with getting any of it to gel. The bison has a lot of gelling agent.

  • Owl
    Owl Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

    Sounds yummy! As always, Admins, thanks so much for sharing all your amazing knowledge!

  • kbmbillups1
    kbmbillups1 Posts: 1,377 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I was cleaning out my freezer today and found some grass-fed beef bones in the very back of it. I was just thinking of making some bone broth with them. I make mine in my crockpot and add all the same things you guys talked about. I let it cook all day. Mine becomes gelatinous especially after cooling.