Veggies for small spaces

I was talking to a friend today and telling her how to get more veggies in a smaller space with less work. With our economy she and her family are more concerned aboput how to grow more food with less work and space.

https://www.ruralsprout.com/grow-food-vertically/

Comments

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Monek Marie I was surprised that hops were on the list. I guess I've never thought of eating it even when young. I've known it for beer making, most recently in herbal infusions and other herbal preparations. So I learned something new. 😁

    There was, even more, she could have added so more than 10 technically.

  • Kuri and Kona
    Kuri and Kona Posts: 177 ✭✭✭

    Great article! I have definitely been researching growing vertically lately, as this saves so much space in the garden. Also, it seems to help prevent diseases that might be picked up from the soil.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Kuri and Kona I love vertical gardening. I started it mainly to help with pests but I like everything about it. And yes it does help with disease.

    I do admit I did not plan for my gourd trellis to have quite as much weight and it collapsed.

  • Merin Porter
    Merin Porter Posts: 1,026 admin

    This is something I want to do more of. Thanks for sharing!

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree with @Merin Porter. This is something I want to do more. I set up vertical growing for my cucumbers and luffa already this year. I think I will try my squash also. I had not thought of trying it it with melons. I might have to play with that one and see if I can make it work. I want to do strawberries in hanging baskets on the fence also. That would be yummy and pretty.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Some veggies come as a veggie that takes less space. I have small bush cukes, winter squash (Pumpkins - I think). I look and see what I have and post over in seed swap area.

    Also stacking your crops and interplanting saves space. Under as tomato I grow beans and later some sort of greens. Rasishes work great for marking where you planted seeds and when ther seeds get about 3 ro 4 inches tall the radishes are ready to harvest.

    You get a longer crop from pole beans than bush beans (I grew up raising bush beans so its been hard to totally give them up) and some pretty flowers on and off too.

  • Merin Porter
    Merin Porter Posts: 1,026 admin

    @Michelle D I have seen people use pantyhose "slings" for melons growing in a vertical space. I'm sure there are lots of other great ways to support them as they grow, as well, although I do think they need the support -- they get too heavy and fall off otherwise!

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Yes, panty hose work great for support of heavier crops and they are needed for some. You can also use a netted potato bag but the hose are more flexable. I go to garage sales and buy old hose, usually for a buck a bag for a full grocery bag.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Vertical gardening and interplanting are definitely worth a try. Sometimes this is as simple as choosing pole beans and pole peas instead of bush version, and adding a bean tripod, tomato cages, or netting for the plants to climb. Other methods may be more work, but very productive.

    I routinely grow carrots underneath my tomatoes. Sometimes the carrots do well, some years they don't , but they don't seem to hurt the tomatoes at all.

    One thing I've learned from reading and experimenting is that pole peas and pole beans, while both legumes, need different types of support.

    Peas have short tendrils that curl around a horizontal support, so they work well with tomato cages, chicken wire, or netting. Whatever you use must have a horizontal "thing" for the tendril to wrap.

    Pole beans have no tendrils. Instead, the main bean vine grows in a spiral pattern, trying to curl around a support that is more or less vertical. A tripod consisting of three thick branches tied together at the top in a tipi configuration is all you need.

    The tripod approach doesn't work with peas unless you run horizontal twine around it, and the tomato cages and similar approaches don't work for beans at all.

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Merin Porter thanks for the idea! I have cow panels that I use for trellises in my garden. I can easily add a panty hose sling!

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Michelle D

    Just a word of warning. When neighbors and friends drop in you will get that "crazy gardener look" Especially if you use panty hose sections to tie plants up with and forget they are still on your wrist like a braclet.

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Monek Marie I always get that look! In fact my daughter's boyfriend calls me Crazy Second Mama! My husband shakes his head and laughs everytime I try something new in the garden. He has realized that it seems crazy but it usually works so he is glad I do it. My neighbors always ask me over the fence "so what is that for?" Pointing at different things in my garden. One neighbor asked me if the trellises were a duck-port 🤪. Maybe I am a bit crazy but I don't care. I get a kick out of it when people are confused by my uniqueness.

  • nicksamanda11
    nicksamanda11 Posts: 741 ✭✭✭✭

    My neighbors think I'm crazy too. Back to eden gardening in the city adds a whole new dimension to insanity in these folks minds. I think the neighbors on one side are used to the giant piles of woodchips by now😋.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭

    This year I planted peas in February which I normally do. Already we have had two frosts and they are still growing, just slower. I have sturdier poles this year and as they get taller will string them up. After they die down I will plant green beans and use the same poles and string. I have done this many times before. I have very small spaces because I live in an apartment.