Raised bed Garden

dipat2005
dipat2005 Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭✭✭

I asked my son to make a raised bed and he didn't listen to me as much as I would have liked. He insists it needs a bottom with drain holes. I ordered some worms locally and will pick them up ahead of the garden. What can I do with the worms ahead of time (a week). They will come in a yogurt container (I do not know what size the container) is. I am not sure what kind of container to add them too. I am thinking something with a lid. I also wondered if food scraps would work with them. They are red worms. I have a lot of frozen food scraps waiting to make bone broth and wondered if that would work?

Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,690 admin

    @dipat2005 Where is your raised bed going to be located?

    I've never done a worm farm before so I'm no expert but you can get expert advice in TGN's Academy in two courses, Vermicomposting and Worm Bins. Both are short "Weekend" courses. I'm pretty sure you can store your worms in the fridge for a short period of time but don't quote me on that.

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    When my husband purchases worms for fishing I keep them in the refrigerator. They need to be cool, have plenty of air and stay moist. Make sure that there are vent holes in the top of the container and that the soil doesn't get dry. It shouldn't be soaked just damp. I spray the top of the soil with a spray bottle every few days. They usually last about 2 weeks in these conditions. It wouldn't hurt to put some small compostable scraps in there for them to eat on.

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @dipat2005 the worms will be ok in a container. Have a couple drainage holes, so they don’t drown. Keep a lid on, undercover or in the shade somewhere so they don’t cook. Just feed them leftover veg scraps or pulverise your defrosted food scraps in a blender & pour some of that on top of your worms. Basically just try & recreate how a worm farm would be until you get your soil in the raised bed.

    As far as the bottom on a raised bed, unnecessary.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @torey I forgot to mention this particular garden will be on the east side of the building. And thankfully there is no bottom. Thank you @JodieDownUnder and Michelle D. I will put them the refrig asap. If I poke holes they will get out? I really don't want worms in my fridge!

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I noticed that there were already holes poked in the top. I had saved some vegetable scraps so I fed them and put them into the fridge. Thanks for the help.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My son put in the Cedar raised bed garden and we added some soil. Then worms and food for the worms and then more soil. I still have to get more bags which I will do soon. That was a lot of exercise already this morning.

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dipat2005 that is so exciting. Please share pictures when it is done.

  • SuperC
    SuperC Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭

    I’ve not yet worked with worms much except for whats already in the soil. Your son may have a point to what he’s thinking about. So, perhaps roll out chicken wire under the frame for drainage and also, to deter rabbits. @dipat2005

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This picture shows a part of the 8 foot garden bed. It already has 5 bags of mushroom compost in it and it still needs 2 more bags. Plus I need one more bag for the front garden bed which I stripped of Beet greens and Celery yesterday. There were a lot of greens left so I am bagging them now.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,293 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SuperC the only problem with adding mesh is that the bed is already in place and there are 5 bags of soil on top. We do have rabbits in the neighborhood. Someone is always losing a bunny.