landscaping around a house foundation

Monek Marie
Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

In our area bushes were always the normal landscaping technique. I think it helped in severe winters to keep the cold from the home. Now some people do not recommend it saying it can cause foundation and moisture issues. I agree that certain shrubs could cause issues.

I am getting ready to replant the area around the house and want easy and some edible plantings.

Any ideas?

Comments

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,519 admin

    @Monek Marie That is correct. It also gives rodents and snakes a safe place to hide & possibly find a protected way into a home.

    I would not fully discard the thought of shrubs. Just maybe plant them a bit further from the foundation so it still allows air movement when they are mature. Find some that don't have invasive roots as well. I would sit down & make a paper plan with a little curvy flair for interest. I would interplant edible & medicinal flowers & herbs with these shrubs, keeping in mind the asthetics...the size (height & width), color, texture, and the seasonal aspect as well (early, med/late blooming periods, etc.).

    This is the part I absolutely loved when I worked at the nursery. Do you know someone close by who is familiar with what grows in your area & loves landscape design as well? Maybe look at some online designs if you can find any with pictures & a drawn layout.

    I'd be over at your place so fast if I lived close by. 😁

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @LaurieLovesLearning At this point in time I only have one shrub by the house. The rest were moved years ago. I am tempted to put a stone walkway by the house and plant in front of that. I did have mainly flowers by the house for a few years but did not like that. Fall cleanup was a pain.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    One thing to be aware of is how flammable some shrubs can be. Despite the fact that evergreens are very popular for structure in a landscape, they are high in flammable resins so they shouldn't be used close to a house. In the FireSmart program, deciduous trees and shrubs are recommended for planting nearer to homes, but don't plant birch even though it is often on a list of acceptable plants. Ornamental grasses are also discouraged. Lower growing plants with succulent leaves are suggested for planting closer to homes.

    There are some FireSmart suggestions in this link. From Manitoba @LaurieLovesLearning.


  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,519 admin

    @torey That sounds like really good advice. I am quite familiar with the trees/shrubs listed. I was surprised that tamarak is not a flammable as other coniferous trees.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I don't live in a fire issue area but its always best to be prepared.

    After looking at the house and studying it I have decided (I really don't want many bushes in front of the house. My grandfather put them for decor but the front exposure is west and south and any heat needs to reach the house in the winter. I am best to use rockery or another form of heat capture or sun reflection. I plan to keep my Moms favorite Bush and add a azalea but the rest will be patio and kitchen garden area.

    Bushes will be placed on the north mand east for wind break but away from the house