Sandwich meats

Monek Marie
Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

Has anyone ever made their own sandwich meat? Or have healthy ideas for sandwiches?

I love deli meat but want to find other healthier options for a sandwich

Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    I only remember my mum making head cheese once. It was OK but what I really liked was her jellied tongue. Thinly sliced it made excellent lunch meat. I've made it a few times but hard to duplicate hers. And hard to find tongue nowadays.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @torey Tongue can be hard to find. Our one gourmet store carries it with a stiff price.

    Our other option is a local butcher who does butchering for farmers. Most do not want tonque so it's reasonable there. Thye will hold it aside for anyone if they know they want it.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    Sure! I love smoked turkey - I brine it, smoke it and then slice it thin. I make hams, pastrami, corned beef, etc. I really need to get into making salamis, bologna, etc soon. Oh, and I make AWESOME head cheese!

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 All sound fantastic. How do you make the corned beef?

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,461 admin

    From my cookbook:

    Corned Beef and Pastrami were originally ways of preserving beef. Many old corned beef recipes from England and Wales used only a salt brine. The name, “corned” refers to the grainsized kernels of salt that were used. Now, we would always include some curing salt that contains saltpeter, both for the color it gives the meat and to help prevent spoilage. Most folks also include sugar and whatever pickling spices they like - coriander, mustard seed, cloves, dill, allspice, ginger, garlic, star anise, black pepper corns etc. The meat, usually a beef brisket, is brined in the liquid for several days or even weeks, on refrigeration. Corned beef is then roasted and served with cabbage or on a sandwich. It is very tasty. Pastrami is made the same way, but after brining, the meat is heavily coated in more herbs and spices and smoked. I prefer pastrami, but both are phenomenal, really. Pastrami and sauerkraut pair wonderfully on rye and/or pumpernickel bread with some, pickled onions, horseradish infused mustard and Swiss cheese.

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've wondered over the years about making my own too, @Monek Marie.

    And for a time we didn't eat meat and I came across this book.

    I bought the digital version of this to try. However I don't recall if I made anything or not. But I thought it might give you some more options. 😊

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I make homemade hummus about once a week, and find that it is not only a good dip, it also works well on sandwiches. The garbanzo beans in the hummus give it a high amount of protein for a vegetable dish, so I don't put lunchmeat on my hummus sandwiches.

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I love homemade hummus sandwiches. @VermontCathy you should try adding some sliced cucumber to them. It adds some tasty crunch.😋

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @Monek Marie I have not made any luncheon meats & these days eat much less of meat in general but today I whipped up a snack & it was a winner. Toasted Turkish bread & added goats cheese, avocado, tomato, basil leaves & a squirt of wasabi mayo.😋

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 2023

    @JodieDownUnder That sounds great! I'm going to have to try it.

    @VermontCathy I been planning to try hummus but it's one of those things I have put off - for whatever reason. Do you leave the skins on the garbanzo beans?

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Monek Marie, I have an easy hummus recipe for you to try. I've tried several and this is my favorite. If you have a decent blender it's a sinch. If not, no worries a food processor works too, it's just not as smooth necessarily.

    2 c (1 can drained) chickpeas

    1-2 cloves garlic

    1/2 t sea salt

    juice of 1 lemon (1/4 c)

    1/8 t ground cumin

    2-3 T tahini

    1 t olive oil

    Puree all ingredients, except olive oil, until smooth adding a little water or broth if too thick. Before serving drizzle on olive oil.

    Fresh lemon juice is key. And I've noticed that adding broth, instead of water, to help get to the correct consistency adds an excellent depth of flavor.

    I hope you give it a try. And if you do let me know what you think.😁

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JennyT Upstate South Carolina I will give this a try. Thank you

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @JennyT Upstate South Carolina Very similar to my recipe for hummus. If I have the time I will roast a whole head of garlic and use that instead of fresh.

    I really enjoy hummus as a sandwich spread, too. With lots of added veggies.

    For a little variety, try different beans in your hummus. I've tried black beans and they are very good. Didn't care for red kidney beans but white kidney beans were OK.

    @JodieDownUnder's recipe sounds good except I might use bocconcini instead of goat cheese.

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @torey that would definitely work but I am a goats cheese fan. I buy an Aussie product called Meredith Dairy & they do goats cheese very well & it doesn’t have that strong “goaty” taste. I also saw a story on their management style & ethics & thats why I also enjoy their product.

    I also toss it into salads, pasta & stuff figs with it & wrap in pancetta. Yummo 😋

  • nicksamanda11
    nicksamanda11 Posts: 742 ✭✭✭✭

    Goat cheese is amazing!

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Monek Marie There's no need to remove the skins from the garbanzo beans.

    Soak them overnight, change the water, and cook them until soft. I use a pressure cooker, which only needs 15 minutes of heating at 240F. If you cook them on a stovetop, it will take longer.

    Then dump all the ingredients in a blender and puree. There are many recipe variations out there, as the exact ingredients (apart from garbanzo beans) aren't that critical.