Calcium vinegar

heirlooms777
heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭
edited May 2023 in Wild Edibles & Medicinals

Looking to make vinegars from native Michigan plants and anything else right now. @Torey What local (and not so local) plants do you recommend? I have the book “The Herbal Kitchen” by Kami McBride but it seems to be all difficult plants to grow. Thank you! —Christina

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Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    A lot depends on your soil as to whether or not plants will have optimal amounts of any minerals. Many people live on soil that has been farmed for a long time and has become depleted. That being said, following is a list of plants and herbs that have the highest amounts of calcium.

    Green leafy vegetables are a good source, including: kale, collards, turnip greens, Swiss chard, mustard greens, amaranth, orach, broccoli (or rapini), bok choi, Chinese cabbage, etc. Wild greens would include dandelion, stinging nettle, lamb's quarters (pigweed) and wild sorrel (dock). Stinging nettle has more minerals that just about any other plant. Lamb's quarters seeds have 3 times the calcium found in the green leaves.

    Malva neglecta is also high in calcium and I believe it is fairly common in Michigan.

    This is a recipe for a nettle vinegar from the Herbal Academy and a list of uses.

    I would probably use dried plant material when making the vinegar so the moisture in fresh plant material doesn't dilute the vinegar.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    I forgot oatstraw and/or milky oats. That would make a high calcium vinegar.

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    Thank you! What vinegars can use fresh plants. Any? Gratefully, Christina

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    You could use any fresh plant material, keeping in mind that the vinegar will be slightly diluted which may affect its shelf life.

    Flowers don't usually have as much moisture content as leaves and they make excellent vinegars. I'm using a white wine vinegar that I infused fresh chive blossoms in last summer and it is still very good. I'm planning a nasturtium flower vinegar this year.

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭
    edited May 2023

    That sounds great making a nasturtium’s vinegar, I eat them like spinach, and the flowers are perfect on top of meals, they are so pretty and taste a little spicy. I’m thinking of making vinegars from what you mentioned above: kale, collards, turnip greens, Swiss chard, mustard greens, amaranth, bok choi, Chinese cabbage, etc, and wild greens such as dandelion, stinging nettle, lamb's quarters and wild sorrel. We have a lot of stinging nettle. What about purslane? —Christina

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @heirlooms777 I'm just curious. What uses do you plan for having these varieties of vinegar?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    Purslane could be used as a vinegar. Not sure about its calcium content but it is one of the few plant sources of Omega 3 fatty acids.

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    @Michelle D what do you recommend?

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    @Torey genious

    I wonder how long it would last, if at all, on the shelf. And what would be the best recipe?

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    I was just answering Michelle’s question and I lost my whole story. I’ll write more later. In one word, homesteading? —Christina

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @heirlooms777 I'm sorry I don't have any recommendations. My curiosity is based out of lack of knowledge. I look forward to whatever you write later whenever you get to it.

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    I am hoping to use vinegars, tinctures, honeys and such as food and medicine. I probably could put purslane vinegar in the refrigerator. I will try. I wonder if they would need refrigeration before straining. Also looking for a good cloth to strain with.

  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭

    I'd definitely go with nettles. Just haven't had the time nor energy to get out and forage. Getting so warm now that I may have waited too long.

  • marjstratton
    marjstratton Posts: 1,132 ✭✭✭✭

    Went and looked at the article. I got off on a tangent and looked at the article about dead nettle. Not sure why it has never crossed my radar. It seems to be as useful as regular nettles. Didn't see anything in the article about whether it is rich in calcium or not. More research to be done. It is abundant in my yard and a plant I need to get better acquainted with.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    @heirlooms777 I'm not sure how long a purslane vinegar would last in comparison with others. I've never tried it. Most of the other vinegars (made with dried herb) should last 6 months to a year.

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    Do you think dried purslane would lose the omega 3 fatty acids?

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    This study indicates that dried purslane does retain the EFAs and other nutrients but it is dependent on the drying method. Vacuum drying seems to be the best but I'm not sure how practical that is for the home. In the conclusion it lists the most effective ways of dehydration based on their results. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4573115/

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    @torey is it too late in the season for up north to make calcium tinctures?

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,102 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'll definitely have to look up this article tomorrow when I am more awake. Haven't been able to find any stinging nettle growing wild near me even though I know it grows wild here. So I bought some seeds and have some starts waiting to be planted out. So I will be looking for ways to use them.

    I will have to work them in slowly back during the pandemic I tried drinking some nettle tea made from dried nettle leaves I purchased from Mountain Rose Herbs and they made my lips and tongue tingle and burn a little. So possibly a full strength issue there. I have had no trouble before that or since using it as a small portion of a tea blend with other herbs, only when it was straight nettle leaves brewed for the tea.

    I would really like to incorporate them more into our diet since they are so nutritious.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,623 admin

    @heirlooms777 Not quite sure what you mean by up north, but I am still making vinegars for their minerals and other than vickeym I am one of the most northerly members on the forum.

    I harvested horsetail a couple of days ago and it is in vinegar now.

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    @Torey @marjstratton wrote the above about waiting too long. I am going to try to forage at the community garden tomorrow. They throw out barrels of native plants. Looking for my foraging book and printing out this article. I am new to making anything, this will be my first vinegar, and I’m excited Είμαι χρεωμένη. I live in Michigan

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,102 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @heirlooms777 as Torey mentioned I am in a far north category. Living about 2 hours north of Anchorage Alaska. LOL So for me even what is considered cold climate gardening, isn't for my kind of cold.

    However, we are the land of the midnight sun, so what does grow here can grow very well. Not unusual for the folks who grow for records to end up with pumpkins close to or over the 1000 pound mark and cabbages near or over 100 pounds.

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    It’s crazy amazing. I used to live on a 40 acre island closer to Kodiak, Alaska. It’s really beautiful up there.

    Right now I am in Michigan. It’s closer to Canada, in fact, this is the one spot where Canada is lower than the United States.

  • Linda Bittle
    Linda Bittle Posts: 1,515 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I want to say that we made a horsetail vinegar at Wilderness Awareness School. I know it's high in silica, so avoid if you have a silicone allergy. But I think it's high in calcium, too. Of course, I cannot locate my info right now.

    How to Make Herbal Vinegars – LearningHerbs

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭
    edited June 2023

    You are all quite amazing. For whatever reason getting started is a little over my head right now. I don’t know why. It’s like I’m frozen or something and fear or laziness for what it is I don’t know.. I’m thinking of just taking what is now old and bitter dandelion greens and making a vinegar. It’ll be a little bitter because it’s older now in Michigan, but it might be good. I might have access to an organic farm that just compost their wild native plants. If I go in there and ask nicely, they might give them to me. Should I do that? And if so, how? I know this sounds stupid, it can’t be that hard . But somehow I’m just a little frightened? Does that make sense? Could I take send up some pictures here perhaps to make sure I know what I’m doing? Even they know what a Michigan plant is what, and the app on my phone doesn’t seem to work and say what the name of the plant may be.

    lavender conference this weekend, which I am so looking forward to. Hopefully I can meet some people — in person — who can actually point out the details about everything.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,102 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @heirlooms777 My husband lived on Kodiak for a time. Have not had the chance to go there yet. You might also be able to either ask at your nearest cooperative extension or they may be able to put you in touch with a master gardener in your area. If your on Facebook at all you might be able to find a local group that can identify plants or a foraging group. We have multiple groups here that can help give us information. Of course I'm careful whose information I accept but it often gives me enough information to do more research of my own or points me in a direction to get more help.

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    @vickeym I am trying to mentor other people. Then I can learn by doing

  • nicksamanda11
    nicksamanda11 Posts: 741 ✭✭✭✭

    Eggshells in ACV

  • heirlooms777
    heirlooms777 Posts: 208 ✭✭✭

    @nicksamanda11 what do you mean by ACV?

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,505 admin

    @heirlooms777 ACV = Apple Cider Vinegar.