is it possible to transplant greens?

I was reading someone else's information on transplants but I didn't see the information I was looking for. Is it possible to transplant greens? I always plant seeds too close together.

I noticed I had two twelve inch spots that didn't come up at all. Either they are slow or I will be doing a lot of transplanting of greens.

I also need to add some more dirt around some of the seedlings when they come up a bit more.

It is easier for me to plant most of the seeds by attaching them to paper towels with Elmer's or school glue and then planting them. The seeds come up in abundance. The pea and bean seeds are much larger so I sow those directly into the ground.

Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    Yes, you can transplant greens. Do it in the cool of the evening so they have the night to recover. If you transplant in the morning, they will be exposed to the heat of the day and are more likely to wilt.

  • kbmbillups1
    kbmbillups1 Posts: 1,377 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Yes last year I grew greens in my hydroponic unit and then transplanted them outside on a day when we were expecting a lot of rain. I had a lot of trouble figuring out what was eating my seedlings so this was the best way to grow them larger before transplanting them.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭✭

    @Torey I hadn't thought about the cool of the evening. Great idea! I tend to do everything in the garden in the morning when it is cool. Over the weekend we are going to have really HOT days around 100 degrees F.

  • SuperC
    SuperC Posts: 951 ✭✭✭✭

    On time i pruned a tomato plant by cutting of the sucker. I then planted the sucker into the ground. Now as its been growing, there is a set of yellow flowers on it that may potentially have tomatoes.

    yes, transplanting greens is possible. And as mentioned above, do so at dusk so there is less stress on the plant/s.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭✭

    A bird dropped a seed in the raised bed garden and I transplanted it-in the am but it grew and now it is 18 inches tall and the green leaves are huge. It was dropping so I shored it up with some more dirt. The onions were drooping too so I did the same thing.

    I have never had greens that got that tall before!

  • kbmbillups1
    kbmbillups1 Posts: 1,377 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SuperC I have gotten 7 extra tomato plants by doing the same thing except I put each sucker in my hydroponics unit. A few days later it has so many roots it's amazing.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭✭

    Both the leaves and the plant were drooping. I picked the leaves and as mentioned above added some dirt to the base.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭✭

    Several days ago I took a small hand trowell out and used it to scoop some greens out of the earth and transplanted them into another spot. They had about four leaves on them so even though they were small they are doing well. I also sprayed them with my special spray- water and hydrogen peroxide.

    I did transplant them in the morning though because it is still HOT in the evening here. It is between 50 and 60 here in the morning and 80 at night.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Definitely yes. Some professional farmers recommend starting lettuce indoors and transplanting it out at the correct spacing instead of relying on uneven seeding.

  • Monek Marie
    Monek Marie Posts: 3,537 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I usually transplant all my greens. I have more control over them when they are young. I transplant them on cloudy days and early morinng or later in the day.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I'm trying to start lettuce inside now under lights, planning to transplant it out once it is large enough to survive the pressure from slugs and snails.

    Unfortunately I was away for a couple of days just when it was sprouting, and it came up very thin and leggy. I'm hoping that once the leaves develop properly, I'll be able to transplant it deep enough with the leaves just barely above the soil.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭✭

    @VermontCathy how do you keep your starts from getting leggy?

  • SuperC
    SuperC Posts: 951 ✭✭✭✭

    To prevent starts from getting leggy, make sure the amount of light and correct temperature hours are enough.

  • nicksamanda11
    nicksamanda11 Posts: 742 ✭✭✭✭

    I jerked up a kale when I moved in the winter and put it back in- middle of winter and it lived and is thriving! That kale really must be some powerful stuff in our bodies if it can do that😋

    I also transplanted a parsley in winter when we moved and it absolutely flourished. Incredible what made it and what didn't.

  • MissPatricia
    MissPatricia Posts: 318 ✭✭✭

    In my area of the South, I have started spinach in the refrigerator and transplanted them into the garden. I also transplanted other greens, like arugula, that were too closely spaced.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I started a large tray of Pirat lettuce from seed about a week ago, then transplanted it out into the garden last weekend.

    So far these lettuce plants seem to be doing very well. Usually you wait until there are a few true leaves before transplanting, but I went ahead and transplanted it at the large seed leaf stage.

    Soon I will start another tray of spinach, then transplant that out as well.

  • Scott M
    Scott M Posts: 1

    Absolutely, you can definitely transplant greens! If you've planted seeds too close together and are dealing with empty spots, transplanting can be a great solution. Carefully dig up the extra seedlings that are too close together, making sure to disturb the roots as little as possible. Replant them in empty spots with proper spacing between them. This way, you're giving each plant enough room to grow and thrive.

  • dipat2005
    dipat2005 Posts: 1,279 ✭✭✭✭

    @Scott M thank you. I didn't do quite like you suggested but they seemed to do well. They are enjoying being under a soffit and on the north side of the apartment building.