Freezing sea buckthorn berries

My buckthorn (hippophae rhamnoides) bush is expanding. I try to dig out the baby plants and give them to neighbors, but there are still plenty left. And the amount of berries the main plant produces is huge. Harvesting is quite tricky. I cut branches with berries, cut off the thorns and then pick the berries. The ones left on the bush are for the birds.

the berries contain so much vitamins like A,C,K,E and buckthorn oil, of course. I eat as much as I can during the season, but then I want to store as much as possible. Some I mixed with honey and froze in small jars. I also freeze separate berries and then store them in bigger bags in the freezer.

i add them to my daily yogurt.

the rest is for the birds, although I did not notice many birds on it. May be it is not local in the area and the birds are not used to it.

how do you store buckthorn berries?

Comments

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    My attempts at growing sea buckthorn didn't go well. I don't think I had them in a very good spot. They only lasted one winter. That was many years ago, so I am going to try again as soon as I find some starts.

    I would likely be freezing the berries. Probably making jelly and a syrup, as well.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    My frozen ones 😊

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,613 admin

    @jowitt.europe oh I wish I could have some sea buckthorn plants! I've been drinking tea f the berries and leaves as part of a protocol to help with radiation exposure. I've run out... sigh. It's tasty tea.

    Although I live in the tropics I would love to try and grow them here. It is such an important plant for me. Any chnce you can ship some? (grin)

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    I would love to ship you some. My sea buckthorn expand like mad. I have to dig out the small plants regularly.

    Unfortunately, after a quick googling I understood that shipping from Austria to the USA a self grown plant might take much too much effort and end up in no result with fines. (There was a warning of destroying plants and issuing fines). The world is small, but the mobility of plants is not so easy. On the other hand it is ok. Insects and plant illnesses spread much too fast anyway.

    Buckthorn plants grow on sand under harsh conditions. In my garden they thrive in the mountain soil. The plant seems to be able to adapt to different climatic conditions. You might find a plant that will thrive in your area. But then it might be invasive…

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,613 admin

    Well, thanks for looing it up.

    I looked in Etsy but there were no US sources and the smae issue for UK or other places.

    I know I'll find it eventually. And of course there is the question of will it grow here? LOL

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    @Marjory Wildcraft You can get seeds from Richter's in Canada. They have 3 different cultivars listed. I'm sure they ship to PR however, the growing zones listed are 3-8. Strictly Medicinal Seeds has them, too.

    It says that the seeds need stratification to germinate but I can't find any info as to whether or not they require a cold dormancy period like other tree fruits. 4 years to produce fruit.

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,454 admin

    @Marjory Wildcraft you mentioned that you use sea buckthorn leaves. Thank you very much for this hint. So far I never used the leaves. Let them fall and rot. After you mentioned them I searched for more information and… rushed to collect the leaves.

  • water2world
    water2world Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭

    @ jowitt.europe You must have found a spot that the buckthorn truly love! Wish I could find any medicinal plant that my yard!

  • water2world
    water2world Posts: 1,156 ✭✭✭✭

    @Torey Thanks for mentioning seed sources. I am going to try this!

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,640 admin

    I also didn't know about the use of the leaves.

    This has me falling down a very deep rabbit hole about the properties of the leaves of sea buckthorn as well as other members of the Elaeagnaceae family that have popped up during the search. I'm not at the bottom yet.

    My only knowledge about this family aside from the properties of the fruit of sea buckthorn, has been limited to my local species; Soapberry (Shepherdia canadensis) and Silverberry aka Silver Willow (Elaeagnus communtata). Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia) is widely used as a landscape plant in south central BC but I wasn't familiar with its properties, either. It seems I have a lot to learn.

    I will report back when I have compiled more info about this family. @Marjory Wildcraft, I am very interested in the protocol you are using. Could you let me know where to find the info? Thanks.