Julia Child: The Way To Cook Meat

judsoncarroll4
judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin
edited December 2020 in Cooking

Excellent as always - wish I had the booklet that went with the videos. An yes, she does eat raw hamburger to check the seasoning!


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Comments

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 She eats raw meat?! 😛

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Awesome. I found the book on Amazon for $55. Ouch!

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I sill can't believe that she actually ate raw meat. I know I never could do that.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    I would hesitate with store bought hamburger and/or eggs due to contamination. But, it it was farm raised and I processed it myself, I wouldn't mind. I like carpacio and tartare.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭
  • NarjissMomOf3
    NarjissMomOf3 Posts: 113 ✭✭✭

    Thanks for sharing this. I usually just make stews with meats. Will try to experiment more.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    Its hard to beat a good stew, but there are so many other options!

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    I know I'll be in the minority on this... but I'm absolutely drooling over her calves' liver and onions!

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,635 admin

    @judsoncarroll4 Everyone should learn how to cook meat from Julia Child!

    That's the way I do my pan steaks, although I use a cast Iron pan and get it as hot as possible. I like my steaks "black and blue". But I make a sauce for them exactly that way. Toughens the meat when it is cooked to anything more than medium rare. Her broiled steak is too well done for my liking.

    Big fan of carpaccio and tartare. Although, I would never use store bought meat for this. I am very fortunate that I don't have to eat store bought meat.

    Gotta say that I am not a fan of veal. But liver is a different matter. So if you are in the minority, I 'm right there with you. I really love liver & onions with bacon. I never get to have it though, cause no one else in my house will eat it. I should just get it and cook it for myself.

    Same way as I do my pot roasts (but no tomatoes). I put my pot in the oven instead of on the stove.

    Not a fan of lamb no matter what cut or how it is cooked. I cook it sometimes cause my husband likes it so much but he gets most of it.

    I did some online searching and found lots of other downloads but not the booklet that goes with this video. Too bad.

    This is the sort of thing that should be taught in school cooking classes.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin
    edited December 2020

    I agree on nearly all points... I like lamb, but I find that cooking deer or goat for most any lamb or mutton recipe turns out better. I think raising the animals makes a big difference - if you have dairy animals, sometimes you just have too many boys or a goat with a "unicorn" horn. I don't like the way commercial veal or lamb is raised usually. So, that is what holds me back from eating much of those meats. That is why I don't get liver and onions often - most I see at the store are the dark red "coffee color" she says not to buy. Real, milk fed calves liver is much lighter and milder in flavor.

    Now, one thing I do very differently is the gravy, like for the pot roast. Maybe it is my French heritage. But, I'd made a roux with the fat she separated from the braising liquid, and flour, then add the broth back in to make a rich, brown gravy.... a few fresh herbs at the end, as well.

    Her French cooking books are excellent, but way too complicated for everyday home cooking. This series though, belongs among the great North American DIY cookbooks - in my opinion, the others are The Joy of Cooking and James Beard's Fireside cookbook. Sure, I'd throw in some good old ones (southern and northern) and some fish and game books, too. But, I think anyone who wants to learn to cook real food, from scratch, the way their grandmothers did, could certainly learn most all they need from those 3. That is my main complaint with food TV these days - they skip the basics. Everything is "semi-homemade" (like mostly pre-packaged) or far too fancy and complex. Get the basics, then explore classic French, German, Chinese, etc. The exception tends to be the good Mexican cooking shows. Aside from moles and such, Mexican food is very basic and includes so many fresh flavors that skill-wise, it is basic, but the flavors are so much better than most anything you can buy!

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I certainly wouldn't eat meat from a CAFO raw. But I routinely taste the raw cookie dough before baking, which has raw egg in it.

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 So those are the books that you recommend, huh? My second oldest daughter is very interested in cooking, baking mostly, but getting more into cooking. I'll have to see about getting these books from the library and possibly our favorite discount book store, if we're lucky. That way we can look at them together and learn "the real way to cook food from scratch" like you said. I prefer to cook from scratch anyways because of my dietary restrictions, a lot safer and tastes so much better. 😊

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,635 admin

    @judsoncarroll4 I prefer a flour based gravy as well. I use cornstarch for other sauces but like flour for roasted meat and poultry.

    @JennyT Second's on the recommendation for the Joy of Cooking. If you can find a copy of The American Woman's Cookbook, its an older book but still, very good basic recipes that everyone should know how to cook.

    I LOVE used books stores!

    There is another discussion with suggestions of favourite cookbooks at https://community.thegrownetwork.com/discussion/comment/875827#Comment_875827

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin
    edited December 2020

    Of course, the best way is to be taught, as I was by my mother, grandmother, grandfather and great-grandmother. But, we live in an era in which an intact family is a rarity. So yes, these are the best books to get the solid , every day skills to cook really good food at home. The Joy of COoking is unique in that a pre-1970 edition shows how to butcher each critter, too... even squirrels! Considering that Mrs. Rombauer was of the Anheuser-Bush fortune... ultra wealthy... that is saying something! She cooked because she loved food... her daughter was a friend of my mother. They could have dined at the best restaurants every night, but they loved real food enough cook it themselves.. it was a passion.

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 @torey I'm on team liver too! I also love lamb. I used to buy lamb breast once in a blue moon- it was about the most gloriously fatty thing you can imagine. I loved mutton to, the one time I had it(in a curry... in a Nepali restaurant... in Japan! No, mutton is not common there.)

    I'll have to check that book out. I was just thinking the other day that, even though I'm an adventurous cook in some ways, I'm kind of ignorant when it comes to meat. I make lots of slow cooked stews, casseroles and curry, but I have to look it up each time if I'm cooking it a different way. I mostly cook for my parents and myself. My dad is about as un-adventerous as they come. My mom is game to try almost any cuisine, but cooks and eats the same couple of cuts, always very well done. Now, I've cooked cow tongue, pig heart, and goat liver- but I can't promise you I could cook a steak.

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @torey Oooo, thank you! I didn't see this thread. I love cookbooks! My husband doesn't like that I'm "old school" and prefer to hold a book in my hands than have something digital. Don't get me wrong there's tons of books, blogs, etc online and that's wonderful to have access to all of it. But I'll print up what I like because I'd rather have some paper/book in my hand. ☺️

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    @torey nailed it on the steak - hot temp! Really thick steaks need to be finished in the oven, but most are good for the grill, pan or broiler. Just remember to poke them. Soft and spongey means rare, tough is well done. The French say that you can compare steak to your nose.... the area near the cheek feels like rare meet, the nostril, medium,, and the tip, well done. Some do the same with the hand... press into the muscle between your thumb and first finger, with your hand open and relaxed. That, is rare. Touch the thumb and finger together and that muscle feels like medium steak, Press the fingers together, and it feels like well done. Beyond that, the biggest secret is to bring the steak to room temp for at least an hour before cooking. Only filet mignon can be cooked cold. But, dang it... now you have me craving tongue!!!!!

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin
    edited December 2020

    @JennyT and @torey I'd be remiss if I didn't recommend the books by my distant ancestors (by marriage, not direct lineage) The Virginia Housewife and The Carolina Housewife.

    Not on archive, unfortunately:

    The Carolina Housewife (First Cookbooks of America): Rutledge, Sarah, Rutledge, Anna Wells: 9780872493834: Amazon.com: Books

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    Oh, and the 1940 Culinary Arts Encyclopedia is awesome!!!

  • JennyT Upstate South Carolina
    JennyT Upstate South Carolina Posts: 1,273 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 Thanks. I'll add those to the book list for me to try to find locally if I can. 🙂

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Finally got time to see the video. I loved it when she said the used herb bouquet looks like a dead mouse.

    We ate a lot of hash when I was growing up, but it never looked like what Julia made.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    I haven't had hash in a long time - definitely looking forward to making some soon!

  • lewis.mary.e
    lewis.mary.e Posts: 225 ✭✭✭

    I never liked beef, because it was always overcooked when I was growing up. As I learned to cook I realized I really like beef medium rare. I was termed a picky child, but these days there are very few foods I won't give an honest try.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    I think eating a wide variety of foods is more important than most people realize - not only for health. The taste buds are directly wired to the brain. Stimulating the taste buds likely improves mental function and even intelligence.

  • Acequiamadre
    Acequiamadre Posts: 269 ✭✭✭

    Go Julia!

    I remember her story of having dropped fish for a big dinner. She stuck it back on the plate, smiled, and served!

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    Alright y'all... somebody ratted on the Julia Child videos and youtube pulled them. We will find a work around... I just ordered them on DVD. The videos are still on youtube, but I'm not going to post a link in case that tips them off. If need be... last resort, I'll just record myself doing Julia's cooking! So, I tried the first recipe - the minute steaks in wine sauce. The first serving was very nice. I just had the leftovers, and they were phenomenal! I made some French fried potatoes and onions, served the beef and sauce over them with sautéed mushrooms.. The potatoes and onions were brown and crispy.... had a glass of red wine and some turnips on the side. It was all so simple and so cheap, but I could not buy a meal like this, anywhere for any price.

  • blevinandwomba
    blevinandwomba Posts: 813 ✭✭✭✭

    @lewis.mary.e I was pretty similar. There was a long list of foods- including most vegetables and beef- that I did not like until I was cooking them for myself. In my case, it was more about seasoning. The roast beef I ate growing up always seemed so painfully bland. Now that I'm a big kid I can turn everything into curry, and I'm happy

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,458 admin

    I tried her hamburger recipe last night - it was REALLY good!

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    For people just easing into cooking, or expanding their range a bit, I recommend Mark Bittman's books. These include How to Cook Everything, How to Cook Everything Vegetarian*, How to Cook Everything Fast, How to Cook Everything: The Basics*, and others as well.

    I have the two with an asterisk (*) and have looked at some of the others in the library. The nice thing about his books is that he doesn't just give a single recipe in a category, but lists many variations. For example, in the section on baked potatoes /twice-baked potatoes, he has about half a page of alternate things you can add to them instead of the usual bacon and sour cream, which changes the flavor dramatically. Did you know that peanut butter, olive oil, or miso were good additions to potatoes?

    My mother taught me to cook basic American food, and she is a good cook, but after leaving home I wanted to learn more cooking styles and techniques. I've accumulated more cookbooks and am always keeping an eye out for more!