Eye opening video on Shortages

RustBeltCowgirl
RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

Saw this mentioned on a blog and thought it might be interesting here. Very matter of fact. No politics.


Comments

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    He explains the shortage situation very well. Growing your own food and medicine is the way to go.

  • MaryRowe
    MaryRowe Posts: 736 ✭✭✭✭

    The article is a good reminder of just how globally interconnected and interdependent our economy and supply have become. The current crisis in India affects us and the rest of the world as well. I did not realize how dependent we were on China and India for our medicines, That's scary--and certainly an incentive to get pro-active about health and to learning to grow and use herbal medicine.

    Given the fragility of our supply system and infrastructure, what the article describes might well be hardly more than the tip of the ice berg. Certainly the more self-reliant we can be, the better off we will be in the months and years ahead,

  • karenjanicki
    karenjanicki Posts: 961 ✭✭✭✭

    We've noticed meat shortages here.

  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    After mulling this over, I realized a shortage that was caused by the Evergreen blockage: garden gnomes. Material to produce them were stuck in the Suez Canal.

  • Michelle D
    Michelle D Posts: 1,465 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The microchip shortage is a really big problem here right now. Car plants are having to shut down and lots of people are temporarily out of work. I get the feeling that shortages are going to cause a lot more than an inconvenience for a lot of people.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wow, it's like a domino effect. Brace yourself!

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,503 admin
    edited May 2021

    So many people actually dislike garden gnomes and have wondered how to rid themselves of such an invasion.

    I guess this is the way. 😆

    What an suprising shortage that is.

  • kbmbillups1
    kbmbillups1 Posts: 1,370 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've been listening to Mike Adams and few other people talk about being prepared for a long time now. I keep saying I'm going to listen to his audio book on prepping but I haven't gotten around to it. Ever since the toilet paper shortage I've been trying to keep a good stock of everything. Before then I'd get down to a couple eggs, a couple rolls of toilet paper, etc but have been restocking much sooner now. I've also tried to think of things to have on hand like rice and beans that will last forever and I can cook outside if there's no power.

    One thing I've had a hard time finding is canned cat food. Seems like a weird thing to have a shortage on.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    "The whole meat distribution system is truly a little odd. We may produce the meat in the U.S., ship it to China for processing, then back to consumers here. That’s far from the farm-to-table model."

    Wow. Just wow. How on Earth can that be efficient, no matter in what weird way you define efficiency?

    "You can see this problem when you pick up meat from your grocery store meat department. Have you noticed the label that says your steak was processed either in Canada, Mexico, or the United States? To me, that’s rather scary that they can’t tell me the source of one steak."

    This I understand, having worked for a major grocery retailer.

    Grocery chains have very thin margins. They have to minimize costs anywhere they can.

    Keeping products sourced from different companies separate so that they could be labeled differently would be complex and add significant cost. Grocery companies just don't want to deal with that. They will continue to throw tomatoes from Mexico and those from Florida in the same box in the warehouse, and when it gets to the store all they know themselves is "product of USA or Mexico".

    Which is probably also why those engineered tracking sprays are coming into use. Be careful what you ask for, because it may not get implemented the way you want or expect.

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,613 admin
    edited May 2021

    Mike can be difficult to listen to - he is so emotional! But I agree with his fundemental message - you need to prepare.

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,613 admin

    Hey @RustBeltCowgirl thanks so much for posting this. I reached out to City Prepper to see if he would like to collab. I really like his non-political, non-inflammatory style.

  • Marjory Wildcraft
    Marjory Wildcraft Posts: 1,613 admin

    And if you've got the stomach for it... Ice Age Farmer has a new video out on the three major forces that are pushing the globally system into full-on collapse. Inflation, supply chain disruptions, crop failures. He lays it out. Ice Age Farmer is also non political.

    I think its better to know than not know, but gosh, it sure is hard sometimes.

    Brace for Impact


  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 2021

    OMG. As I was listening to him (and by the way, he's a "cutie"), one of the thoughts that flashed through my mind was about the old movie "Soylent Green". That's a seriously scary potential future.

  • frogvalley
    frogvalley Posts: 675 ✭✭✭✭

    I was thinking of Soylent Green last week when we had the gas shortage here in Virginia.

    My daughter's husband didn't think it was necessary to curtail the family plans for visiting a farm about an hour and a half away. Having been through several gas shortages, I had to politely request an in home tea party for the kids instead. We had a great time and I had enough gas to return home even though the station I stopped at closed their pumps just as I pulled in. We'll have enough gas for the next week so I'm not worried about THIS shortage. Just trying not to panic about the future.

  • flowerpower *
    flowerpower * Posts: 257 ✭✭✭

    I find that shopping less often is a way to get used to the idea of planning, and stocking up. I try to shop once a month, though I don't stick to that, and make do when I run out of things. I am thinking of going to shopping once every two months, and then go to longer periods without shopping. I don't think I finished watching his prepping videos yet either.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    We typically shop as much as twice a week, but most of those trips are small fill-in trips to get a few items that we need. Our larger shopping trips that fill the pantry take longer, and those probably happen about once every two weeks.

    We keep a running list of what we need on an erasable white board on the refrigerator. Any time I open the next-to-last container of anything we use routinely, I write that item on the shopping list. Items we use more frequently are purchased in larger quantities. (For example, when we buy salsa, we'll buy 3 of them at once.)

    If you need to buy fresh food, there is no substitute for doing it frequently. Most TGN members aren't growing all of the vegetables they use, especially in the winter months. I plan to can more in the future, but I am running up against the size limits of my garden.

  • Tave
    Tave Posts: 952 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This is an interesting video. I heard a lecture years ago that, while on a different subject, offered good advice. To overcome a problem, you first have to accept it exists.

  • RustBeltCowgirl
    RustBeltCowgirl Posts: 1,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    "To overcome a problem, you first have to accept it exists."

    @Tave That is the reason that I don't even discuss it with my parents. They don't want to see it, let alone accepting it exists.

  • Brindy
    Brindy Posts: 212 ✭✭✭

    Thank you for posting. I try not to live in fear, but do believe in being prepared. I love that he was very master of fact and no politics. Thank you!

  • Brindy
    Brindy Posts: 212 ✭✭✭
    edited May 2021

    I accidentally pushed post comment again and it will not let me delete, but will let me edit it. Sorry everyone!

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Upton Sinclair wrote, “It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends on his not understanding it.”

    For "salary", read livelihood, cherished beliefs, security, comfort, or any number of other things.

    That said, I believe that there have been too many "gloom, doom, the sky is falling" claims, books, articles, and so forth over the past 50 years. The boy can only cry wolf so many times before most people say "enough".

    Remember books like _Bankruptcy 1995: The Coming Collapse of America" (published 1992) and many similar works?

    Being prepared is good. Being panic-proof and ready for unexpected Black Swans is great. But worrying excessively about particular predictions is not.

    Perhaps you've heard the old joke, "the stock market has predicted nine of the last five recessions," variously attributed to Keynes and other economists. For "stock market", read any type of economic analysis.

    So be prepared, have a plan, make yourself as self-sufficient as possible. Cultivate your spiritual life. Connect with your neighbors and like-minded people in your region. But don't fret or worry (Philippians 4:6-7).