Question for Canadians and Aussies

judsoncarroll4
judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,451 admin
edited June 2023 in Cooking

Whenever I watch cooking programs done by folks in these countries, they always use milk in a plastic bag. Is this the only or most common way milk is sold where you live? We have jugs in the US.

For instance


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Comments

  • Linda Bittle
    Linda Bittle Posts: 1,515 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've never made chicken that way, but it looks really good. (No idea about milk in bags.)

  • JodieDownUnder
    JodieDownUnder Posts: 1,483 admin

    @judsoncarroll4 I never seen that form of milk container. Aussie milk traditionally comes in 1,2 or 3lt harder plastic jug type form a like this local product.


  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,621 admin

    In my part of Canada, you can buy milk in similar plastic jugs to what Jodie has mentioned, in 1L, 2L and 4L sizes. Its also available in 500 ml, 1L and 2L poly-coated cartons like these.

    There are at least two dairies in BC that still sells milk in glass bottles; 500 ml and 1 L size.

    You used to be able to buy milk in plastic bags here for a short period of time in the 70s or maybe into the early 80s but I can't remember the last time I saw milk sold in bags. From what I understand they might still be sold in Ontario or parts of the Maritimes.

    Or for those of us lucky enough, a gallon jar straight from the source.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,451 admin

    I wish we still had glass jars.... I wish even more that it was legal to sell and buy raw milk!

  • jowitt.europe
    jowitt.europe Posts: 1,446 admin

    @judsoncarroll4 we do have glass jars. But our milk in shops is pasteurised. However, some farmers have milk fridges where you bring your own bottle, insert 1€ and get 1 Liter raw milk.

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,451 admin

    That is awesome! Until I can get dairy animals again, I am stuck with ultra-pasteurized in NC unless I drive down to SC to buy raw milk and try to smuggle it in. Right now, I am trying to figure out issues with bears. I can't have livestock again until I figure out how to protect them from black bears.

  • vickeym
    vickeym Posts: 2,095 ✭✭✭✭✭

    In Alaska, it is common to use electric fencing rated for bears. Stronger shock than what is used for hogs or basic livestock.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,621 admin

    Similar here. Strong electric fencing for anyone with an orchard or livestock that needs protection.

    Or a Defender. :)

  • judsoncarroll4
    judsoncarroll4 Posts: 5,451 admin

    I guess I will have to do electric fencing, but it is going to have to be very high. I have a ridge behind my property and due to the high spots, I have found no answer for critters finding a way over. A neighbor tried everything only to find about a 500 pound bear climbing rocks and trees to get over!

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @judsoncarroll4 Some stores sell milk that is pasteurized, but not ultrapasteurized. This is useful to know if you want to use it to make cheese.

  • VermontCathy
    VermontCathy Posts: 1,980 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've read that shelf-stable milk is commonly sold in Europe, but not in the US. I wouldn't be surprised if it is sold in some type of bags.

    Can any of the Europeans here comment?

  • SuperC
    SuperC Posts: 937 ✭✭✭✭

    In the Caribbean we use milk in Tetra box cartons that stay on the dry shelf until it is opened, and milk in bags that we place in the fridge. I guess bags are easy to pour and leaching does not occur as do plastic containers. However, with enough plastic containers, one can make a small floatable boat.

  • Torey
    Torey Posts: 5,621 admin

    @VermontCathy We had shelf stable milk here in tetra paks in BC but its another product I haven't seen for awhile. Not sure if I'm just not noticing it or if it has disappeared from the market. On looking, I found that Costco Canada sells a brand called Grand Pre.

  • LaurieLovesLearning
    LaurieLovesLearning Posts: 7,500 admin

    I'm late to the conversation, but as far as milk goes, my answer is the same as @Torey's.